Infinity Goods blog

A blog for God’s People

Archive for February 13th, 2008

Everything For His Glory: Chapt. 7 Purpose Driven Life

Posted by infinitygoods on February 13, 2008

Green Tree HDR by dontoto1 from Flickr public files“Everything comes from God alone. Everything lives by His power, and everything is for His glory.” Romans 11:36

Everything. Absolutely everything comes from God. So isn’t it appropriate that we should praise Him, thank Him, and Glorify Him?

Rick Warren writes “Living for God’s glory is the greatest achievement we can accomplish with our lives.” I can testify that working directly for God is the greatest feeling. When I worked for our church, I did not feel I was working for my earthly employers. I felt I was working for God.

While working for the church, people came to our staff, myself included, to be served and people came to hear about God, Jesus and religion. People even came to be loved and some had no one else to love them so they became a close part of the community. And if you love God, how can you not worship Him when you are on church grounds all day long? It is indescribable the amount of joy and energy one receives from even just attempting to glorify God. I fall so short of being like Jesus Christ, but God still rewarded me, and us, with joy and energy and all the gifts needed to serve and love and speak about Him.

Our Deacon had the most amazing gift to say the most glorious things to make grieving people find hope. He would say it was not him, but the Holy Spirit speaking through him. He would say that he struggled to speak and every once in a while we saw that. But when someone needed to be served and loved, the most amazing words flowed out of his mouth like the softest, most comforting breeze enveloping in a blanket of love. It was the Holy Spirit. We witnessed it time and again.

Warren says “God will give you what you need if you will just make the choice to live for him.” I would even say if you will just make the choice to TRY to live for him. If you just take that first step with all of your heart and soul, God will carry you the rest of the way.

Now most reading this, I’m sure do not have the privilege and opportunity to work directly for God in a church, but you have families, neighbors, coworkers. You can serve them for God’s glory. Much of our staff’s work was completely mundane, but we did it all for God’s glory. When you answer that telephone at work, do it for God. When you dust a table, praise God that you have a table to dust. When you water a plant do it to keep one of God’s creations alive. When you clean a child’s throw up, do it because God trusts you.

Your entire life, your very breath can be dedicated to God’s glory. You can even say as suggested in the Purpose Driven Life, “Jesus, I believe in you and I receive you.” It sounds a lot like communion and you can glorify God — you can do this in remembrance of Jesus.

If you truly meant the words “Jesus, I believe in you and I receive you,” Warren urges that you tell someone. You can even e-mail him, you can comment here, you can tell a Christian friend, you could even tell a complete stranger, but tell someone.

Today, we finished the first section of the book to find out what we were put on this earth for. For the next seven days, we will look at the second section which describes our first purpose: we were planned for God’s pleasure. Keep thinking about what we read and discussed this week and I’ll be back tomorrow to discuss Chapt. 8. Blessings to you and yours.

Posted in America, book, books, Christian, Christianity, Church, culture, education, Faith, Family, Flickr, God, Home, Infinity Goods, infinitygoods.com, Lent, life, Purpose Driven Life, religion, Spiritual, spirituality, Tradition, U.S., United States, USA | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Thursday Thirteen #16: Books I Want To Read

Posted by infinitygoods on February 13, 2008

thursdaybannerbook.png

For more participants visit Thursday Thirteen.

Let me know if you’ve read any of these and how you liked them, or let me know what you would highly recommend as don’t-miss-books. Wishing you all a Happy St. Valentine’s Day Thursday!

1. The Animal Dialogues: Uncommon Encounters in the Wild by Craig Childs (non-fiction) I love adventure, but the best I can do is Adventures in Barbecuing and an occasional camping trip so I live vicariously through books in the comfort and safety of my armchair. Childs will take me to Alaska, Washington, Colorado, Arizona and New Mexico to discover beautiful creatures like the Great Blue Heron, ravens, owls, coyotes, mountain lions and jaguars. Some of these animals are in my own backyard and I often watch them through my windows so it won’t take much imagination for me to be transported to the great wildernesses of our American West.

2. Paris Review Interviews edited by Philip Gourevitch (Non-Fiction — the 3rd volume in a series is to be released soon) I’m a journalist and a writer so interviews, authors and writing are always of interest to me. Here writers have interviewed other writers like Steven King, T. S. Eliot, Jorge Luis Borges, John Gardner and Alice Munro.

3. The Folded World by Amity Paige (Fiction) I’m not so much interested in the basic plot, but in the subplot dealing with schizophrenia and other mental illnesses, as I once worked for a crisis helpline with more than our fair share of schizophrenics which always made me think that some local doctors must have been giving our phone number to patients. The book is about a young social worker torn between the needs of his clients and of his own family.

4. The Worst Hard Time: The Untold Story of Those Who Survived the Great American Dust Bowl by Timothy Egan (Non-Fiction) It has history, travel and according to the reviews I’ve read, superb, award-winning journalistic talent, so how can I possibly resist?

5. My Life In France by Julia Child (Non-Fiction) My husband and I were at the bookstore recently, a favorite pastime of ours, and I became completely engrossed by this book. In this memoir, she recalls her years in “La Belle France” as she calls her adopted home during the 1950s. She describes my native country as only a lover of France and its people could. It is a consummate love affair with everything French and she transports us to a time where she finally finds her self and her calling while in the arms of her other amour, her husband Paul Child. I don’t know how I could possibly have missed this book for the last two years. Julia is my favorite chef because her recipes are well-tested. She is the only chef I would trust enough for me to cook a recipe for the 1st time and serve it to company or even to a stereotypical evil mother-in-law. I know without even the shadow of a doubt that she will guide me right down to the last grain of salt and will not only tell me what to do, but much more importantly, what pitfalls to not fall into. Julia doesn’t just give us recipes, she teaches us how to cook.

6. Reading For Writers: A Guide For People Who Love Books and For Those Who Want to Write Them by Francine Prose (Non-Fiction) In other words, a guide written for yours truly. 😉

7. House Calls: Reflections of a Family Physician by Thomas L. Stern, M.D. (Non-Fiction) Medicine is another field of interest for me. Dr. Stern was the role model and technical adviser for the Marcus Welby, M.D. television show, and in this book he tells us the story of his life. This quote on the back cover particularly caught my eye: “I’ll tell you stories of the warmth of patients’ feelings toward me as their doctor; but especially, I’ll tell you about how I loved each of them, the people who trusted me enough to refer to me as ‘my doctor.'” Having worked with doctors and having had a few doctors I call ‘my doctor,’ I can tell you that the ones who care are the ones who make all the difference in the world.

8. Rumpole And The Primrose Path by John Mortimer (Fiction) I have read all previous Rumpole books — several times — and it is high time I read this one. Rumpole makes me laugh out loud and heartily, and let me tell you, we adults need to laugh a whole lot more often. I also love the Rumpole PBS series with Leo McLeod also of The Prisoner.

9. The Reluctant Tuscan: How I Discovered My Inner Italian by Phil Doran (Non-Fiction) From the writer and producer of The Wonder Years and Who’s The Boss, this travel memoir is reminiscent of A Year in Provence by Peter Mayle and the cover promises another laugh-out-loud adventure.

10. Gerald’s Game by Stephen King (Fiction) I was recently given this book I had never read from the early 1990s. I hope it’s one of King’s really-scary-in-a-great-sort-of-way books and not one of his books describing evil because I don’t like those. But his truly scary ones are the work of a tremendously talented writer

11. Summer of Night by Dan Simmons (Fiction) From the library of the same person who gave me Gerald’s Game. I never read horror except for Stephen King, but since King says “one of those rare must-read books. I am in awe of Dan Simmons,” then I must have been missing something good all these years.

12. The Tomb of Tutankhamen by Howard Carter (Non-Fiction) Another adventure in my armchair to help me experience the greatest archaeological discovery and excavation of all time. Tut has fascinated the world since 1922 and I too have fallen prey to his magical hypnosis from beyond the sarcophagus.

13. The Best Cat Ever by Cleveland Armory (Non-Fiction) If you too have ever been owned by a cat, you might also want to read about Polar Bear and his curmudgeon author.

Don’t forget to leave a comment so we can all visit you too. 😉

    Posted in America, American Cookery, author, Barbecue, blog, blogging, Blogroll, book, books, Britain, British, carnival, Cookbook, Cookbooks, Cooking, culture, england, entertainment, Food, France, history, Home, Infinity Goods, infinitygoods.com, Italy, Kittens, Library, life, nature, Paris, pets, reading, Recipe, television, Thursday 13, Thursday Thirteen, Tips, travel, U.S., Uncategorized, USA, writing | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 5 Comments »