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Archive for the ‘Early American History’ Category

Find Free Classics And Coupons On-Line At Read Print

Posted by infinitygoods on January 28, 2008

Agatha Christie Upton Sinclair Virginia Woolf

http://readprint.comI’m sharing with you something of interest to students, literature enthusiasts and coupon-clippers. This unusual combination can be found at Read Print, a site offering free on-line access to the classics, where you’ll find thousands of books, short stories and poems by many of the must-read authors. At Read Print, you’ll also find a biography and illustration of each author. There is a section for articles on literature and writing, as well as that unexpected and unrelated section for coupons for all sorts of companies such as Payless Shoes and Office Depot which must keep Read Print financially alive. The site which has been online since 2006 provides clean, clear, easy-on-the-eyes and well organized pages. There’s also a search feature to help you find exactly what your looking for.

Robert Frost Emily Dickinson William Shakespeare

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Posted in America, American History, author, book, books, Britain, British, coupons, deals, Early American History, education, england, entertainment, Family, France, free, frugal, history, Home, homeschool, homeschooling, Household Tip, Household Tips, Infinity Goods, infinitygoods.com, Internet, Library, life, novel, Photography, reading, savings, Tips, U.S., Uncategorized, United States, USA, Website, writing | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments »

Daylight Saving Time: Don’t Blame it on Benjamin Franklin

Posted by infinitygoods on November 4, 2007

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Did you remember to change your clocks? If you are a U.S. resident in any state other than Arizona and Hawaii, it’s time to fall back 1 hour because of somebody’s stupid idea of daylight-saving time.

I already can hear some of you telling me it was Benjamin Franklin’s idea, one of our Founding Fathers and one of history’s greatest men.

And I answer, not true.

Ben Franklin wrote an anonymous spoof, a satire, a parody, a travesty for the entertainment of the editors of the Journal de Paris and mutual high-society, party-going Parisian friends in 1784.

He had them rolling on the floor laughing when he wrote things like Paris should put guards at every candle shop to prevent Parisians from buying too many candles.

“Let the same salutary operation of police be made use of, … that is, let guards be placed in the shops of the wax and tallow chandlers, and no family be permitted to be supplied with more than one pound of candles per week.”

Remember too that Paris is and was in those days too, the City of Lights. There are more lights in Paris on any given day than there are in most U.S. cities during the Christmas season.

They kept right on laughing when Franklin told them Paris should tax one gold Louis coin for each window blocking the sun’s light.

“Let a tax be laid of a louis per window, on every window that is provided with shutters to keep out the light of the sun.”

Their eyes must have teared up by so much laughter when the great scientist and inventor wrote that he had just discovered that the sun rose as early as 6 a.m. and not only does it rise that early, but it also gives off light that early. He even consulted his almanac to verify the truth of this concept. Of course you do remember that Franklin himself wrote that almanac under the pseudonym Richard Saunders (Poor Richard).

“I looked at my watch, which goes very well, and found that it was but six o’clock; and still thinking it something extraordinary that the sun should rise so early, I looked into the almanac, where I found it to be the hour given for his rising on that day. I looked forward, too, and found he was to rise still earlier every day till towards the end of June; and that at no time in the year he retarded his rising so long as till eight o’clock. Your readers, who with me have never seen any signs of sunshine before noon, and seldom regard the astronomical part of the almanac, will be as much astonished as I was, when they hear of his rising so early; and especially when I assure them, that he gives light as soon as he rises. I am convinced of this. I am certain of my fact. One cannot be more certain of any fact. I saw it with my own eyes. And, having repeated this observation the three following mornings, I found always precisely the same result.”

The muscles in their faces must have ached from so much laughter and you can read for yourself the entire article in English if you still believe the hogwash we are fed by politicians each year.

Here’s the link, http://webexhibits.org/daylightsaving/franklin3.html

Ben Franklin was much too smart to seriously want the entire country and the world to go through the stupidity of changing clocks one hour twice a year.

Daylight Saving Time is a nuisance at best and a public danger since traffic accident rates rise sharply each time we are forced by governments to fiddle with our clocks.

Don’t blame Benjamin Franklin for Daylight Saving Time. He laughed at the idea.

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Posted in America, American History, blog, blogging, culture, Early American History, Friendship, Home, homeschool, homeschooling, humor, Infinity Goods, infinitygoods.com, Internet, Letter Writing, life, NaBloPoMo, NaNoWriMo, National Blog Post Month, National Novel Writing Month, News, politics, reading, U.S., Uncategorized, USA, writing | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

1796 Best Seller Offers Fresh Glimpse of American Life Then, Now

Posted by infinitygoods on September 13, 2007

I’ve been doing a lot of research about American history lately, particularly the overland journey to the Wild West. In looking for information, I found a fantastic book. It is the first American cookbook, written and published in the United States of America using American ingredients and methods in 1796!

It is chock full of information and tidbits about life in a new country. Of course it has recipes. Some are strange for the 21st century, but most are mouth watering just reading them. But most interesting are the author’s views and opinions, not about food, but about life in general. She reminds me of the millions of bloggers today who write about their lives. Some naysayers think it’s nothing but a silly fad, but I believe it has the potential to teach future generations, hundreds of years from now, what and how our society thinks and behaves.

In reading “American Cookery by Amelia Simmons, an American Orphan” (yes, that is part of the title), I am finding how very much alike our society today is to our ancestors’ at a time when our country was new.

Simmons writes, “The world and the fashion thereof, is so variable, that old people cannot accommodate themselves to the various changes and fashions which daily occur.” Daily occur — did you read that? Just like today we have new developments like iPhones and blogs, in 1796 they too had daily changes. Just like today the younger and older generations are set in their own ways, so were they in 1796. Even 200 plus years ago, people were lamenting the good old days Simmons tells us, “They will adhere to the fashion of their day, and will not surrender their attachment to the good old way — while the young and gay (happy), bend and conform readily to the taste of the times, and fancy of the hour.

These very comments could have been made today.

And just like today, there were plenty of backstabbing, jealous people too. In an advertisement for the book, Amelia Simmons had to place a notice that while the book was prepared for publication someone changed some of the ingredients “with a design to impose on her (the author), and injure the fate of the book.” She adds the corrections to the advertisement and future editions.

She also has opinions on orphans and female character. All this in a cookbook using plenty of ingredients which at the time were not familiar in England and Europe, such as corn cobs, turkey and cranberry sauce.

Historians say she was also the first to use the new words “cooky” and “slaw,” and that her book was so popular she had to write expanded second and third editions in 1800 and 1831. Future cookbooks even copied her ways of “American Mode of Cooking” and borrowed her recipes.

Mary Tolford Wilson, in an essay for the Institute of Early American History and Culture, writes, “Amelia Simmons still holds her place as the mother of American cookery books. And no later work, however completely it may reflect the mores of this country, has quite the freshness of this first glimpse caught in the small mirror held up by an American Orphan.”

Now that’s true American innovation!

Posted in Amelia Simmons, American Cookery, American History, American Orphan, Cookbooks, Cooking, culture, Early American History, Institute of Early American History, life, Mary Tolford Wilson | Leave a Comment »