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My Beloved Is To Me A Cluster Of Henna Blossoms

Posted by infinitygoods on March 11, 2008

http://the160acrewoods.wordpress.comFor more participants Spreading God’s Word with Word Filled Wednesday, visit Amy Deanne at The 160 Acre Woods.”My beloved is to me a cluster of henna blossoms in the vineyards of Engedi.” Song of Songs 1:14

This is the henna blossom which produces the temporary ink for the Middle Eastern and Indian body art tradition.

Henna Blossom temporary body art in henna by Jamie McAlpin with artist's permission

Henna blossom temporary body art by Jaimie McAlpin with artist's permission

You may freely reprint the following article or place it on your website by adding the statement: Courtesy of www.kingtutshop.com. This fascinating plant is world wide known for the beautiful coloring dye that is used by the Orientals in coloring their hands and body. The Egyptians are said to have prepared both an oil and an ointment from the flowers for making the limbs supple. Egyptian Royalty were said to dye their hair with Henna leaves. Henna’s botanical name is Lawsonia Inermis,its common name is Jamaica Mignonette, Mendee, Egyptian privet, smooth Lawsonia. Its Arabic name is henna and the most popular Indian name is Mendhi.

The earliest civilizations that can be proved to have used henna include the Babylonians, Assyrians, Sumerians, Semites, Ugaritics and Canaanites. The leaves of the henna plant are the source of a red-brown dye widely used for body art, known as mendhi in South Asia. First used in the Near East and South Asia, henna art is now popular around the world.

There are numerous artifacts from Iraq, Palestine, Greece, Egypt, Crete and Rome from 1400 BCE to 1AD that show women with henna patterns on their hands. The early center of the use of henna as a woman’s adornment seems to have been in the eastern Mediterranean, where it grows wild. It was used by the Canaanite women in pre-biblical times The Canaanites spread their traditions, including the use of henna, across North Africa between 1700 and 600 BCE, specifically establishing the Berber traditions of henna in Morocco.

Henna was used in Palestine from the earliest historical period, and there are Roman records of henna being used by Jewish people living in Jerusalem during the historical period of the birth of Christ.

When Islam began in the 6-7th centuries AD, henna was incorporated into the customs of Muslims from the western Middle Eastern women’s henna traditions that were widespread and long established. As Islam expanded quickly into other countries, the use of henna went with it. All of the countries that were part of the Islamic world have used henna at some time, most frequently as part of wedding celebrations. Most of them continued to celebrate the “Night of the Henna” and regard henna as a beautiful and suitable ornament for women until present day.

Since 1890 it has been widely used in Europe for tinting the hair, usually in the form of a shampoo, many shades being obtainable by mixing with the leaves of other plants, such as indigo. As a dye for the skin or nails the powder may be mixed with lemon juice, made into a paste with hot water, and spread on the part to be dyed, being allowed to remain for one night.

The parts used are the leaves that are dried and then crushed to form a dark green powder. The flowers and also the fruit are also used. Flowers are numerous, small, white or rose coloured and fragrant. The plant lives scarcely in dry decidious forests, widely cultivated as a hedge plant. It is mostly found in Egypt, India, Kurdistan, Iran, Syria.

It is widely cultivated in tropical countries but probably native to North Africa and Asia. It is widely naturalized in the West Indies and Mexico where it is known as “mignonette.” Its leaves produce the henna or alhenna of the Arabs (cyprus of the ancients), a yellow die which is used in Egypt and elsewhere by women to color their nails, and by men to die their beards, and for other similar uses including horses manes and tails. It is known in the West Indies as “Egyptian privet”, and sometimes as “reseda”.

The small, white and yellow, heavy, sweet-smelling flowers are borne on dwarf shrubs 8 to 10 feet high and reaching a height of up to 6 meters, the plant has fragrant white or rose-red flowers.

Henna is planted today primarily as an ornamental hedge, but is probably best known for the dried, ground leaves traditionally used to produce colorfast orange, red, and brown dyes.

The constituents of Henna is found in it in a brown substance of a resinoid fracture, having the chemical properties which characterize the tannins, and therefore named hennotannic acid. Dried, powdered leaves of henna contain about 0.5 to 1.5 percent lawsone, the chief constituent responsible for the dyeing properties of the plant. Henna also contains mannite, tannic acid, 2-hydroxy-1:4-naphthoquinone resin mucilage, gallic acid, glucose, mannitol,fat, resin and mucilage are also present.The colouring matter is the quinone .and napthaquinone.

USES

Medicinal Action and Uses

As a medicinal plant, henna has been used as an astringent, antihemorrhagic, intestinal antineoplastic, cardio-inhibitory, hypotensive, and a sedative. It has been employed both internally and locally in jaundice, leprosy, smallpox, and affections of the skin. The fruit is thought to have emmenagogue properties.

It has also been used as a folk remedy against amoebiasis, headache, jaundice, ranging from beriberi to burns and bruises ans leprosy.Henna extracts show antibacterial, antifungal, and ultraviolet light screening activity. Henna has exhibited antifertility activity in animals and may induce menstruation.

Henna has been used as medical treatment for wide range of ailments to cure almost anything from headache to leprosy and other skin disorders. It is used to create an instant ‘Scab’ on large areas & is believed to have antiseptic properties. As a cooling agent it is used for burning of skin. It also has great dandruff fighting ability.

Henna is also used for rheumatic and arthritic pains. Alcoholic extract of the leaves showed mild anti- bacterial activity against Staph aureus and E. coli’. Antibacterial and antifungal activities have been confirmed .The antihaemorrhagic properties are attributed to lawsone. The naphthoquinone has emmenogogue and oxytocic actions.

The dried leaf and petiole of henna are generally recognized as safe when used as a color additive for hair. A distilled water prepared from them is used as a cosmetic, and the powdered leaves have been in use from the most ancient times in Eastern countries for dyeing the hair and the nails a reddish-yellow. Traditionally henna is used to decorate hands and feet during weddings and other ceremonies.

Henna features in the Siddha system of medicine. Siddha physicians consider parts of henna to be astringent, detergent, deodorant, cooling and a sedative. Fresh leaves mixed with vinegar or lime juice are bandaged onto the soles of the feet to treat ‘burning feet’, a symptom of beriberi. Ground leaves are applied to sore joints to ease rheumatism. The juice of the plant can be applied to the skin for headaches, and the oil is applied to hair to prevent it from going grey.

Its flower oil relieves muscular pains, while its seeds are used as a deodorant and to regulate menstruation. Henna flowers induce sleep, cure headaches and bruises. Leprosy has been treated by henna bark, as well as by an extract of leaves, flowers and shoots. The bark has also been used to treat symptoms of jaundice and enlargement of the liver and spleen. It can be applied to the skin to treat eczema, scabies, fungal infections and burns.

The Ayurvedic system uses the henna leaves to treat vitiligo (pale patches on the skin where pigment is lost), and the seeds are used to cure fever. Fruit oil is a folk remedy used in disorders causing hardening of the liver and diaphragm, and an ointment made from young fruit is used to prevent itching.

You may freely reprint the following article or place it on your website by adding the statement: Courtesy of www.kingtutshop.com.

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In Memoriam, Helena, ‘Thrice Blessed Momma’ Passes

Posted by infinitygoods on February 24, 2008

In Memoriam Helena Thrice Blessed Momma We have lost one of our blogging sisters. A young mother of 5-year-old triplets has passed away only 2 years after the passing of her husband. These dear babies, Zoe, Madison and Jonathan, now have no parents. It was a sudden death and the family does not yet know the cause.

Helena of Thrice Blessed Momma had written in her next to last post, “I’m exhausted! This goes way beyond being tired. More than PCOS tired. More than SAHM of Triplets tired. More than I need to lose some (okay, lots of) weight tired. This is even more than PCOS-triplets-I need to lose weight tired. This is that and so much more. Deep in your bones tired. If I had no children and no responsibilities at all and could stay in bed and sleep for a month, I don’t think it would help. And it’s not depression either.”

And yes, the red type is hers, not mine. While her entire blog was in the traditional black type, this post was in bright red, crying out for help.

The family will be putting her blog into a book for her children. They are also interested in collecting memories for the book, and Helena’s cousin wrote in the comments section of Robin’s blog at Around the Island, “I can be reached via e-mail at samantha_edelman@hotmail.com. Please pass the word.”  Whether or not you knew Helena through her blog, years from now, when these babies are older, I’m sure it would please them to see many comments from all over the blogosphere in support of their dear mommy, whom they might only barely remember since they are so young.

I’ve only today discovered Helena’s blog through Robin’s blog post, but it has touched me. She had a good blog, and it was full of love for her children and her husband. I encourage you to visit her blog as friends would visit a memorial. Her blog can be a virtual memorial so that through blog hit statistics her family and her children can see how much she was loved too and how much blogosphere sisters (and brothers too!) care about each other.

Please do take the time.

Posted in blog, blogging, Blogroll, Childhood Memories, Children, children's stories, culture, Faith, Family, God, Health, Home, Infinity Goods, infinitygoods.com, Internet, Jewish, Legacy, life, love, Memories, reading, religion, Tradition, Uncategorized, writing | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments »

Thursday Thirteen #13 — 13 Resolutions And Why They Will Fail

Posted by infinitygoods on January 2, 2008

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Wow, 13 Thursday 13s already.

I never make New Year’s Resolutions other than resolving NOT to make resolutions! Here’s 13 reasons why the top 13 resolutions around the world fail.

  1. Lose weight: Doomed from the start because it’s almost impossible to escape corn syrup. It’s in everything! Statistics show that weight gain in the United States has gone up 4000 percent since the 1970s and it correlates exactly with the 4000% increase in manufacturers’ use of corn syrup since the 1970s. Corn syrup also increases cravings!!
  2. Exercise: Most people are too tired all day to exercise and when you add to the equation that you have to drive both to and from the gym (in my case it would be a 25 mile round trip to the nearest gym) it makes the whole thing futile unless you can give all of us a few more hours in the day.
  3. Diet: We all have the best intentions until our ALREADY STARVED stomachs get tempted by the aroma of pizza or warm chocolate chip cookies.
  4. Write to far away relatives: Tomorrow I’ll write to my aunt, but when tomorrow comes, well my dear, Scarlett said it best, “Tomorrow is another day!”
  5. Be a better spouse/child/friend: If we couldn’t do it on Thanksgiving or on Christmas Day, what makes you think that we can miraculously do it by procrastinating waiting until January 1.
  6. Stop procrastinating: Some people do procrastinate because they just don’t want to do something, but most of the time, people just don’t have enough hours in the day to accomplish everything on the TO DO list. Give all of us another few more hours in the day AND the energy to do it, and I guarantee you we’ll all procrastinate a whole lot less. Until then, that resolution is guaranteed to be broken quickly.
  7. Get more sleep: If you live in the city, be sure to pass a law forbidding garbage trucks to stagnate under your window and beep when they back out with a 13-point turn. While you’re at it, pass a law to forbid all traffic, all honking, all loud neighbors, all barking dogs until after you have woken up on your own and are well-rested. If you live in the country, make sure the rooster is blind and your neighbor has agreed to milk the cows and do all your morning chores. And above all, regardless of where you live, be absolutely sure that you do not have any children under the age of 50.
  8. Keep a clean home: Unless you want to get rid of the dirt-tracking, slobbering dog, get rid of the germ-carrying, toy-scattering kids, maybe even the food-eating, clothe-wearing spouse, that’s going to be a tough one. Even at the Carlsbad caves in New Mexico, they have to spend thousands of volunteer hours dusting and picking dirt and lint out of the stalagmites each year and nobody even lives there. You do LIVE in your house, don’t you?
  9. Quite smoking/drinking/and God-forbid taking drugs: These are all substances which affect your brain receptors. You not only have to get rid of a nasty habit, but you have to get your brain and your physiology to stop reacting. With very hard work and lots of will-power you might be able to quit, but your body will always be addicted. It would be much easier to resolve to never use and abuse these substances in the first place.
  10. Reduce stress overall: LOL! LOL! When I hear people say that it reduces MY stress because it makes me laugh so much. Of course this is probably the easiest resolution to achieve. All you have to do is die and go to Heaven. That’s all. Now, be careful! Make sure you DO NOT, I repeat DO NOT, commit suicide under any circumstance, because then you’ll die and go to hell!
  11. Reduce stress at work: If you work with people, it’s impossible. Unless maybe if you work with French people, because I seem to recall Napoleon saying “Impossible is not French.” You can’t work with machines or robots because they are designed and programed by people. Now maybe if you want to follow in Jane Goodall’s footsteps and go to the jungle to live with animals. They say animals reduce stress — as long as they’re not trying to eat you!
  12. Get out of debt: First thing is to sell your house because a mortgage is a 30-year debt. Sell your car too since you don’t want car payments. Cut up your credit cards which will of course wreck your credit score, but that’s OK since you don’t want any debt.
  13. Save money: That is another way of saying join the rat race, because to save money you have to earn money with a job and you have to work your little rat wheel faster than INFLATION. Also, don’t believe all those commercials that say you can save money if you go to their stores, because what they conveniently forget to tell you is that to save that money, you have to spend money first, so you’ll have to stat in that giant rat race.

If I didn’t deter you from making resolutions, just remember that it takes at least three weeks to form a good habit, so don’t give up before then, and best of luck and Happy New Year to you and yours!

If you want to see the list of Thursday 13 participants, just click here.

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USDA Approved Our Eggs

Posted by infinitygoods on December 29, 2007

2007-12-29-059-usda-eggs-copy.jpg The United States Department of Agriculture agent approved the eggs I bought just moments before I picked them up. You see pictured here the USDA tag. It was a hot topic of conversation at my husband’s work, and in the decades we’ve been alive, neither of us has ever come across one of these before, nor have any of the people we spoke with. It was so unusual, in fact, that the customers at the store were all looking at the tag suspiciously and refusing to take these eggs. My husband and I grabbed them all the faster. I have no idea what it is the USDA inspects when the agents are looking at eggs, but obviously these passed the test and have the initialed tag and the #5 scribble on the carton itself to prove it. Besides, I thought it would be an interesting tidbit to share with all of my blog readers. Have you ever bought anything sampled by a USDA agent? The USDA knows eggs, because these eggs were very good indeed!

Posted in America, American Cookery, blog, blogging, consumers, culture, eggs, Family, Food, government agencies, Health, Home, humor, Infinity Goods, infinitygoods.com, Internet, life, natural foods, News, nutrition, Photography, Photojournalism, U.S., United States Department of Agriculture, USA, USDA | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Cloning Pioneer Rejects Embryonic Stem Cell Research

Posted by infinitygoods on November 19, 2007

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Ian Wilmut, the scientist who cloned Dolly the sheep, is abandoning embryonic stem cell research, finally admitting it does NOT work.

Embryonic stem cell research, also called nuclear transfer and therapeutic cloning research, requires destroying the embryos.

According to the Associated Press, “Tens of millions of dollars have been spent worldwide on therapeutic cloning research in the past decade, but nobody has made it work.” Embryonic stem cell research has only caused cancers in humans.

Even Dolly and a few cats cloned had numerous medical problems, premature aging and premature death.

Wilmut told London’s Daily Telegraph, “I decided a few weeks ago not to pursue nuclear transfer.” He will be researching a method inspired by Japanese scientist Shinya Yamanaka of Kyoto University.

Wilmut says that method does not require human eggs or the destruction of human embryos, which, he told reporters, many people are against.

According to AP that has “become a major stumbling block for funding and regulating research.”

It is “easier to accept socially,” Wilmut says.

The new method, called fibroblasts, slips four genes into mouse skin cells. According to AP, the altered cells behave similarly to embryonic stem cells.

Adult stem cell research has been far more successful but has been overshadowed by advertising and political campaigns in support of embryonic stem cell research.

Related research, which is also successful and not only used in the lab but also in human trials, is pig cell research. Scientists and medical doctors have successfully used pig cells as a solvable scaffolding for a patient’s own human cells to grow and replace organs and organ parts such as bladder, heart valves and wind pipes.

The horizon looks just a bit brighter today as Wilmut abandons embryonic stem cell research, opening the door for more scientists to admit it does not work and for the gratuitous slaying of embryonic human life to stop.

  • Don’t know what NaBloPoMo and NaNoWriMo are? Read all about it here and here.
  • Want to know why I’m participating in both? Click here.

Posted in aging, America, Britain, British, Cancer, Christianity, culture, education, Faith, Health, Infinity Goods, infinitygoods.com, Japan, life, Medicine, NaBloPoMo, NaNoWriMo, National Blog Post Month, National Novel Writing Month, News, novel, novel in 30 days, politics, religion, science, Science Experiments, Scientists, spirituality, Stem Cell Research, technology, U.S., Uncategorized, USA, Vatican, writing | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

I Vant Your Blood!!! Help!!! I Need Your Blood!!!

Posted by infinitygoods on October 30, 2007

“I vant your blood” is a favorite saying for Southern California resident Mary Melton, not only around Halloween, but year-round.

It’s never a joking matter for her, and it is an even more urgent need right now because she lives in the seven-county region affected by the California Wildfires and hurricane-force Santa Ana winds.

The Red Cross is always in dire need of that precious liquid of life, our blood, but it is an even bigger need when there is a federal emergency like these fires and winds and during the fast-coming holiday season.

That’s where Mary and her Respect Life Ministry come in. That’s also where every single one of you reading this article worldwide can help in more ways than one.

Especially if you are not from Southern California, your blood, your time, your money is needed right now, so please tell a friend about this urgent need and this article because Sherry Nikirk, senior account manager American Red Cross Donor Resources Development, says, “We import 40-60 percent of our blood supply.”

To some people, to respect life simply means to be against abortion, but it’s much more than that to Mary. It means to love life from conception to a natural death, and for her, that includes helping the Red Cross through blood drives.

With a single blood donation, the Red Cross can help save not just one life, but three.

That means everything to Mary. “I’m extremely committed to pro-life issues, and this falls into that category. Saving people’s lives is a pro-life issue,” Mary says.

She is so enthusiastic about her volunteer work for the Red Cross through the Los Angeles Archdiocese’s Respect Life Ministry, which she heads at her local parish, that she raised enough blood donations to save nearly a thousand lives this year.

Though Mary does not dedicate so much of her time to promote herself or to get any recognition, the Red Cross awarded her second place in the religious category for raising 304 units of blood for the Southern California Region, which comprises seven counties and 381 participating religious groups sponsoring blood drives.

These are the same seven counties which are so affected by the California Wildfires and hurricane-force Santa Ana winds.

On a good day, without a quarter of a million people busy evacuating their homes and finding Red Cross shelters, hotels or unaffected friends and family willing to offer hospitality, only about one-third of the population can donate blood.

“It is now estimated that, due to our aging population and increasing numbers of people who are not eligible to donate blood, only 37 percent of our population is currently eligible to donate,” says Charles Wilcox, Chief Executive Officer of Southern California Blood Services Region. “This is a significant decline from estimates from years past that listed 60 percent eligible. The fact that only about a third of our population can donate blood makes it even more critical that those who can donate do donate,” he says.

Those who can’t donate blood can still volunteer their time, just as Mary devotes so many hours, or they can donate money. Better yet, you can do all three.

According to Sherry, the Southern California Region needs to collect more than 1,500 units of blood each day to meet patient needs. That’s regardless of whether there’s a federal emergency preventing Southern Californians from donating. The need for blood, volunteers and money exists in your community, your state and your country too.

So please, help Southern California victims and help your own community regardless of where you live on our planet, because a fellow human being, maybe even a young and innocent child, needs blood.

As the Red Cross says, “Together we can save a life!”

Here are some contacts both locally and worldwide.

To schedule a blood drive in the United States: 1-800-491-2113

To donate individually in the United States: 1-800-Give Life (1-800-448-3543); (Espanol 1-866-Por Vida; 1-866-767-8432)

To volunteer in the United States: 1-800-498-9910

Worldwide, you can find your local Red Cross contact information at this Web site address: http://www.ifrc.org/address/directory.asp
It will take you to a list of just about every country in the world where there is an International Red Cross or Red Crescent organization. Click on your country to access your local contact information.

If you have a blog or a Web site, I give you full permission to link to this article in the hopes of saving more lives. Let me know about it so I can link to your article too.

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From left, Charles Wilcox, Chief Executive Officer, American Red Cross Blood Services, Southern California Region; Mary Melton, second place winner in the religious category for 2006-2007 with 304 units of blood raised; Glen Pierce, Chairman of the Board, American Red Cross Blood Services, Southern California Region.

Posted in aging, America, blog, blogging, Blogroll, blood money, Caring, Christianity, culture, education, Faith, Family, God, government agencies, Health, Home, Infinity Goods, infinitygoods.com, Internet, life, Los Angeles Archdiocese, Medicine, News, Organizing, religion, U.S., Uncategorized, USA, Website | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

Halloween Safety Tips

Posted by infinitygoods on October 29, 2007

  • Be sure to clear your front yard and steps of any trip hazards.
  • Remove anything which can hurt someone, be damaged or stolen, such as ladders, extension cords, flower pots and containers, bicycles, children’s toys, garden hoses, etc.
  • Clear walkways of leaves and other slip hazards.
  • Be sure to turn on as many outdoor lights as possible.
  • If using candles in your jack-o-lanterns, be sure to leave enough space at the top for the candle to burn safely and make sure decorations cannot blow into the candles’ flames.
  • There are now many styles of inexpensive battery-powered lights to use inside jack-o-lanterns, even styles which flicker. You can also use a small string of outdoor, stay-cool Christmas lights, and you can also use glow sticks, which come in several colors such as green, orange, yellow, pink, etc.
  • Make sure your electrical extensions or outlets are not overloaded.
  • Keep all pets safely inside. Both animals and children can get spooked by each other.
  • Be particularly vigilant about keeping cats indoors and safe from any possible escapes, even a few days before Halloween, as weirdos, cult members and miscellaneous crazies enjoy hurting our dear kitties even more around this time of year.
  • Check all candy before your children eat it.

Infinity Goods Wishes You and Yours a Safe and Happy Halloween!! 😉

 

Posted in America, Children, culture, education, Family, Health, Home, Household Tip, Infinity Goods, infinitygoods.com, life, Tips, U.S., USA | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Blog Action Day — Environment and Organic Foods

Posted by infinitygoods on October 16, 2007

The environment is at the forefront of the news these days, but today the issue was right in front of me at my local grocery store, and the opportunity for an instant consumer poll arose.

As I was looking at my choices in the meat and fish cases, I noticed a woman reaching into the new organic meat section. Having wondered about it myself, I asked her if she had tried it already.

Well, her face lit up and a giant smile emerged. “Yes, it is soooo good,” she said closing her eyes to savor the memory. She told me she was surprised at how much of a difference “organic” made. She had bought organic meat originally as more of a whim than anything else. She now uses it for all her special dishes and said even just a spaghetti dinner is brought to a whole new level. It is well worth the extra money, she advised, especially when considering the health benefits.

Double the money to be exact. The beef had a much more intense color, much darker. I thought it was just like the difference between farmed salmon that is pale despite the artificially added coloring, and wild salmon that is a dark reddish orange.

The label stated, “raised without antibiotics or added growth hormones, in pastures free of chemical fertilizers and fed only certified organic feed.”

And as I thought, “Shouldn’t it always be like that?” I recalled the cattle we see for miles as we go up the state on Highway 5. Those poor beasts do not have a pasture. They are sitting — sardine style — in mud, and the stench is sickeningly powerful even when the cattle have long gone out of sight.

We can’t tell what they are fed when we drive by at highway speeds, but if these cattlemen “care” enough to make their cattle sit in mud and breathe in highway pollution, I can imagine they also care enough to feed them all sorts of hormones, chemicals and perhaps even the best recipe for mad cows.

I’ll be cooking the organic beef tonight for a special birthday dinner and I’ll let you know what we all thought tomorrow.

In the meantime, please let me know what you think of organic meats and foods in general and if you’ve tried organic, how do you think it compared.

Personally, I can’t wait for the prices to get lower as more people start using organic meat and it stops being some exotic product. Good, natural, organic foods should be the norm, not the exception. Where has the pride of our cowboys and cowgirls gone? Isn’t that what America was made of? Our cowboys and our farmers made our country what it is. So why the negative, greedy trend of late?

We need to be conscious of the total disregard for healthy foods by growers and manufacturers across the board unless they think they can “make a buck.” We need to stand up and demand that we not be fed hormones, chemicals, pesticides, cloned meats, engineered flavorings, engineered trouts to turn them into salmons, etc., etc., etc.; the list of Frankenstein science experiments that turn up on our table without our direct approval is too long and much too frightening.

For my related posts, please click on the following:

Salmon + salmon = trout

Popcorn lung

You can’t trust anybody

Farmer’s Market

Blog Action Day is October 15, when bloggers around the web unite to put a single important issue on everyone’s mind – the environment. All bloggers post about the environment in their own way and relating to their own topics. The aim is to get everyone talking toward a better future.

For more information about Blog Action Day or to participate next year, please go to their website at blogactionday.com. And beside their acronim, B.A.D., it is a good thing.

Posted in American Cookery, blog, blogging, Blogroll, butter flavoring, Caring, consumers, Cooking, culture, diacetyl, EPA, farmer's markets, FDA, Fish, Food, Food and Drug Administration, food flavoring, food products, Goro Yoshizaki, government agencies, greed, Health, Infinity Goods, infinitygoods.com, Internet, Kosher, life, manufacturers, natural foods, nature, News, nutrition, organic food, organic foods, OSHA, politics, popcorn, popcorn lung, profit, Salmon, science, Science Experiments, Scientists, Stem Cell Research, Trout, UN, Uncategorized, USA, workers | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments »

You Can’t Trust Anybody These Days!

Posted by infinitygoods on October 12, 2007

As I turned on the TV news today, I was bombarded with recall after recall. On the headlines: infant cold and cough medicine with even the big names like Tylenol, more pot pies, more toys including Mattel again, baby strollers, carriers, etc. with Winnie the Pooh and made in Korea, lipsticks including name brands like L’Oreal and Dior with the prestige of Paris, but actually subcontracted just like Mattel, and the list went on too.

So what’s happening here? Are the government agencies more stringent than they have been in the past and these recalls would have been under the radar until now? Have companies gone insane and they are trying to kill consumers, the very hand that feeds them? Have some evil forces or the 9/11 Terrorists infiltrated even our formerly most trusted name brands in an attempt to kill even our youngest and our psyches? Are Communist countries like China behind it all?

None of it makes sense, but one thing is sure, the enemy, whoever it may be, is lurking behind every product these days.

Forget name brand loyalty. Forget Tylenol, Mattel, Dior. Spending more won’t be a guarantee of getting a decent product, let alone quality.

Forget saving money at the local dollar store or discount outlet. You’ll surely be putting your life at stake with just about every product there being made in China.

As my grandmother used to say, “we don’t know what to eat and drink anymore.” And what was true then, is mind boggling now. And now add “we don’t know what to breathe anymore” too, because even the smell of popcorn is killing us. (See my related blog post.)

It’s no solution for those of us living in cities, but if things don’t get better soon, at this rate, I foresee having to grow our own food, make our own toys, revert back to milk paint, feed our pets people food — actually with our own dog having been killed by the last pet food recall, we’re ALREADY doing that!

It’s a scary world out there. Self-sufficiency is starting to look good not just to wackos, but to the rest of us too. Horse and buggy here we come!

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Tell it on the Mountain. Tell All About Cancer.

Posted by infinitygoods on September 28, 2007

Cancer kills.  It has killed my father.  It has killed my grandmother, my grandfather, an aunt and uncle, and too many other relatives to mention.

Cancer has many forms and names, but the best way to beat the odds is early detection.  It’s never more important than when dealing with a fast-acting cancer such as inflammatory breast cancer.  While inflammatory breast cancer does not run in my family, anything we can do to educate ourselves and others is worth our time.

I am taking the invitation of fellow blogger Memegrl (memegrl.blogspot.com) to spread the word about cancer.  Below is her blog about her friend’s experience with inflammatory breast cancer while pregnant and how to detect this cancer to seek quick help from doctors.  Memegrl asks that you all feel free to post.  If you don’t have a blog, you can e-mail or even use good old word of mouth.

Spread the word because silence is deadly.

I also invite you to use this post as a platform to tell others about your experiences with cancer of any type.

Blessings to all.

“Monday, July 30, 2007
“And now for an important public service announcement

“I know, many of you who know me are well aware that my best friend was diagnosed with inflammatory breast cancer when she was pregnant. (Because she’s an overachiever like that. Most of us would have enough trouble with either cancer OR pregnancy AND working full time but nope, not her.) I had never heard of inflammatory breast cancer until the email from her. (“Are you sitting down? Good. I’m pregnant! I’m due in June and it’s a boy and he’s healthy and we’re thrilled. And I have breast cancer. It’s called inflammatory breast cancer, and it’s one of the most lethal forms, and I’m starting treatment tomorrow.” Yah. That’s the email you like to see from your BFF when you are strung out from trying to nurse your own newborn and desperately seeking comfort and connection from the internet.)

“Since that time, I have learned of three other women with it, which leads me to believe one of three things: 1) the percentage of all breast cancers that inflammatory represents must be growing from the stated 1%-5% (because really, otherwise how do I hear of all these and almost no others?); 2) further proof of the “once you become aware of something you find it everywhere” phenomenon (ever have that happen with a new word or idea–you never heard of it, then find it 6 times in a day?); or 3) it’s getting better press in general.

“Anyway, here’s a post from the latest diagnosee in Bloggityville. Please read it. Please remember it. Please do your BSEs, or remind someone you love. And, thankfully, my BFF is now a few years out and doing well.

“From Toddler Planet:

“Inflammatory breast cancer
“Monday July 23rd 2007, 3:11 pm
“Filed under: About Us / Favorites, breast cancer
“We hear a lot about breast cancer these days. One in eight women will be diagnosed with breast cancer in their lifetimes, and there are millions living with it in the U.S. today alone. But did you know that there is more than one type of breast cancer?

“I didn’t. I thought that breast cancer was all the same. I figured that if I did my monthly breast self-exams, and found no lump, I’d be fine.

“Oops. It turns out that you don’t have to have a lump to have breast cancer. Six weeks ago, I went to my OB/GYN because my breast felt funny. It was red, hot, inflamed, and the skin looked…funny. But there was no lump, so I wasn’t worried. I should have been. After a round of antibiotics didn’t clear up the inflammation, my doctor sent me to a breast specialist and did a skin punch biopsy. That test showed that I have inflammatory breast cancer, a very aggressive cancer that can be deadly.

“Inflammatory breast cancer is often misdiagnosed as mastitis because many doctors have never seen it before and consider it rare. “Rare” or not, there are over 100,000 women in the U.S. with this cancer right now; only half will survive five years. Please call your OB/GYN if you experience several of the following symptoms in your breast, or any unusual changes: redness, rapid increase in size of one breast, persistent itching of breast or nipple, thickening of breast tissue, stabbing pain, soreness, swelling under the arm, dimpling or ridging (for example, when you take your bra off, the bra marks stay – for a while), flattening or retracting of the nipple, or a texture that looks or feels like an orange (called peau d’orange). Ask if your GYN is familiar with inflammatory breast cancer, and tell her that you’re concerned and want to come in to rule it out.

“There is more than one kind of breast cancer. Inflammatory breast cancer is the most aggressive form of breast cancer out there, and early detection is critical. It’s not usually detected by mammogram. It does not usually present with a lump. It may be overlooked with all of the changes that our breasts undergo during the years when we’re pregnant and/or nursing our little ones. It’s important not to miss this one.

“Inflammatory breast cancer is detected by women and their doctors who notice a change in one of their breasts. If you notice a change, call your doctor today. Tell her about it. Tell her that you have a friend with this disease, and it’s trying to kill her. Now you know what I wish I had known before six weeks ago.

“You don’t have to have a lump to have breast cancer.

“P.S. Feel free to steal this post too. I’d be happy for anyone in the blogosphere to take it and put it on their site, no questions asked. Dress it up, dress it down, let it run around the place barefoot. I don’t care. But I want the word to get out. I don’t want another young mom — or old man — or anyone in between — to have to stare at this thing on their chest and wonder, is it mastitis? Is it a rash? Am I overreacting? This cancer moves FAST, and early detection and treatment is critical for survival.

“Thank you.”

Posted in blogging, Breast Cancer, Cancer, Cancer Experiences, Health, Inflammatory Breast Cancer, life, Lump, Mammogram, Mastitis, Medicine, memgrl.blogspot.com | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »