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Archive for the ‘homeschool’ Category

BrainPOP Works For Moms And Kids

Posted by infinitygoods on March 25, 2008

wfmwbluebanner.jpgA bunch of us moms were discussing what works for us regarding our children’s education and a lot of things were brought to the table, but the moms were unanimous about one teaching tool. At the time, it was brand new to me, but my trusted network of moms went on and on, and on about all the qualities of this animated educational site: BrainPOP! I am not affiliated in any way with this company.

All the moms loved it because it truly taught their kids and because their kids loved it too. It works for us, and I’m sure it will work for you too. Go check it out for free for two weeks.

If you use BrainPop, go ahead and put in your two cents.

What teaching tools work for you and your kids?

Be sure to visit Rocks In My Dryer for more participants.

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Posted in America, Blogroll, Caring, Children, Children's games, consumers, deals, education, entertainment, Family, free, frugal, history, Home, homeschool, homeschooling, Household Tip, Household Tips, How To, howto, Infinity Goods, infinitygoods.com, Internet, life, Math, reading, savings, science, Science Experiments, solution, Tips, U.S., Uncategorized, United States, USA, Website, WFMW, women, works for me wednesday, Works For Me Wednesdays, writing | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments »

Inhumane Conditions In The Slaughterhouse Since 1993?? They Told Us California Cows Were Happy Cows!!

Posted by infinitygoods on February 19, 2008

With this week-end’s meat recall, 143 million pounds of beef, the largest Lick by imagegrabber in Flickr public filesrecall in history, comes an even more disturbing possibility. A video has surfaced that shows inhumane conditions may have occurred since 1993. That’s 15 years!! Did the government do anything to safeguard that consumers eat healthy food? Did the greedy big business slaughterhouse have the least thought about the public school children who would eat tainted meat? Are California cows happy cows as the advertising slogan claims? You decide.

Check out Tad Cronn’s article and look at the video he posted.

Posted in America, blog, blogging, Blogroll, boycott, consumers, Cooking, Cuisine, culture, Documentary, education, Family, farmer's markets, FDA, Food and Drug Administration, food products, government agencies, greed, Home, homeschool, homeschooling, Household Tip, Household Tips, How To, howto, infamous, Infinity Goods, infinitygoods.com, Internet, Journalism, life, manufacturers, Media, movies, Nation, natural foods, nature, News, Photography, Photojournalism, profit, publishing, sales, savings, Science Experiments, Shopping, U.S., Uncategorized, United States, United States Department of Agriculture, USA, USDA, Website, writing | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments »

Find Free Classics And Coupons On-Line At Read Print

Posted by infinitygoods on January 28, 2008

Agatha Christie Upton Sinclair Virginia Woolf

http://readprint.comI’m sharing with you something of interest to students, literature enthusiasts and coupon-clippers. This unusual combination can be found at Read Print, a site offering free on-line access to the classics, where you’ll find thousands of books, short stories and poems by many of the must-read authors. At Read Print, you’ll also find a biography and illustration of each author. There is a section for articles on literature and writing, as well as that unexpected and unrelated section for coupons for all sorts of companies such as Payless Shoes and Office Depot which must keep Read Print financially alive. The site which has been online since 2006 provides clean, clear, easy-on-the-eyes and well organized pages. There’s also a search feature to help you find exactly what your looking for.

Robert Frost Emily Dickinson William Shakespeare

Posted in America, American History, author, book, books, Britain, British, coupons, deals, Early American History, education, england, entertainment, Family, France, free, frugal, history, Home, homeschool, homeschooling, Household Tip, Household Tips, Infinity Goods, infinitygoods.com, Internet, Library, life, novel, Photography, reading, savings, Tips, U.S., Uncategorized, United States, USA, Website, writing | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments »

I’m Still Dreaming; I’d Rather Be Singing

Posted by infinitygoods on January 20, 2008

Martin Luther King Jr. (1929 - 1968) I have a dream speach; Print designed by Tio and posted on Flickr’s public files

Would you rather be singing too?

Posted in African American, America, American History, art, Black, blog, blogging, Blogroll, celebrities, Childhood Memories, Children, choir, Christian, Christianity, Church, culture, education, Faith, Family, Famous Speeches, Flickr, Freedom, Friendship, God, history, Home, homeschool, homeschooling, Household Tip, Household Tips, How To, howto, Infinity Goods, infinitygoods.com, Internet, Israel, Jewish, Journalism, Judaism, Legacy, life, Martin Luther King Jr., Media, Memories, murder, Music, Nation, Negro, Negro Spiritual, New Year, News, nonbelievers, Obituary, Organizing, Photography, Photojournalism, politics, Race, Racism, religion, Republic, Resolution, singing, Slavery, Slaves, Speech, Spiritual, spirituality, Tradition, U.S., Uncategorized, United States, USA, Website, writing | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments »

Celebrate Life; Plant Trees On Tu B’Shevat And Year Round

Posted by infinitygoods on January 19, 2008

1 Tree and 1 Bird by Mary B. Bloom uploaded on Flickr public files

When you shall come to the land, you shall plant trees. Leviticus 19:23

At sundown on Monday, Jews around the world will be celebrating Tu B’Shevat, which is the New Year for Trees. It is not a high holiday like Yom Kippur or Rosh Hashanah, but some families celebrate with their children by planting trees, donating to the Jewish National Fund to have a tree planted in Israel, or having a seder similar to the one from Passover as Tu B’Shevat begins the 60 days leading to Passover.

During President Bush’s recent visit to Israel, the Jewish National Fund presented him with a certificate for 36 trees to be planted in his name at the American Independence Park in the Judean Hills and in Negev. The JNF states, “As the present year, 5768 in the Jewish calendar is a shmitta year, when the land lies fallow and no sowing or planting is allowed in the earth of the Land of Israel, the trees that will be planted in the name of the U.S. President will actually be planted at the end of the shmitta year.”

Fellow blogger Robin has an excellent 13-point description of Tu B’Shevat and I encourage you to check her easy-to-understand but detailed information and links.

Posted in America, blog, blogging, Blogroll, Childhood Memories, Children, culture, Earth, education, Faith, Family, Flickr, George Bush, Global Warming, God, Holidays, Home, homeschool, How To, howto, Infinity Goods, infinitygoods.com, Israel, Jewish, Judaism, life, nature, New Year, News, Photography, religion, spirituality, U.S., USA, Website | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Flickr Delivers Library Of Congress’ Historical Eye Candy

Posted by infinitygoods on January 18, 2008

Woman Aircraft Workermain-church-altar-trampas-nm.jpgSunsetlocomotive-driver-wheel.jpgInstructor and Students Studying Map, Meacham Field, Ft. Worth, Texas

The United States Library of Congress pilot program launched on Flickr just two days ago has Web viewers entranced with its display of 3,115 images from the library’s extensive photo collection and clamoring for more.

Last night’s statistics from just one day on Flickr reveals the following:Girl Next To Barn With Chicken

• 392,000 views on the photostream;
• 650,000 views of photos;
• Adding in set and collection page views, there were about 1.1 million total views on their account;
• All 3,100+ photos have been viewed;
• 420 of the photos have comments;
• 1,200 of the photos have been favorited.

The Library has struck a chord with the people of the Internet. Matt Raymond, the author of the Library’s 9 month old blog and director of communications says, “The response to the Library’s pilot project with Flickr has been nothing short of astounding. You always hope for a positive reaction to something like this, but it has been utterly off the charts—from the Flickr community, from the blogosphere, from the news media—it is nothing short of amazing.”

And we all want more photos. The most frequently asked question on both the Flickr and the blog comments is asking when the library will upload even more photos. There are more than 1 million photos on the library’s Web site and some are easily viewable as sample images, but the great majority of these images can only be accessed through search words. If you want to see the images in say their Daguerreotype collection youA-20 Bomber Being Riveted By Woman Worker, Douglas Aircraft Co., Long Beach, California have to type in specific search words, and there my friends is where the Library of Congress’ Web site went totally wrong and where the Flickr project went totally right, because if you don’t know what to search for or you just want to see what’s available, you are facing a computer screen full of daunting type and not one single beautiful image; no eye candy, no mesmerizing piece of history, no emotionally stirring art.

If you like history or photography, or better yet, like me you like both, you will be spending hours pouring over your LOC Flickr screen, so be forewarned, this may be a whole new addiction which might even spawn further interests you will just HAVE to research.

  • A note on the high quality of these historical photographs: “The scans are not color corrected or adjusted to create an optimized view of the photographic scene, rather they represent the qualities of the images as they exist in the collection at the time they are scanned.”
Carpenter, Douglas Dam, TenesseStacks Of Home Canned FoodPutting Finishing Touches On B-17F Navy Bomber

Filling Station And Garage At Pie Town, New MexicoJim Norris Homesteader, Pie Town, New Mexico
  • For an article about Pie Town, New Mexico and Russell Lee, the photographer who chronicled its homesteaders, visit this Smithsonian article.

Posted in America, American History, art, Arts and Crafts, blog, blogging, Blogroll, crafts, Cuisine, culture, education, eggs, Family, film, Flickr, government agencies, history, Home, homeschool, homeschooling, Infinity Goods, infinitygoods.com, Internet, Journalism, Library Of Congress, life, manufacturers, nature, News, reading, technology, Tips, Tradition, U.S., Uncategorized, USA, writing | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments »

Thank-You Note How-To and Sample Ideas

Posted by infinitygoods on January 1, 2008

It’s easy to write a thank-you note if you keep it short and simple. It doesn’t need to be long. It could even just be a small card preprinted with the words “Thank You” that you simply sign and mail. These days so few people send thank-you notes that you’ll really make someone’s day. Just keep it simple and keep it sincere, and it’s never too early to teach children to send a thank-you because even a newborn can draw a scribble.

Here are some samples:

  • Thank you! I love it!
  • Thank you for (fill in the blank). It was such a pleasant surprise on Christmas morning.
  • You made my day! Thank you for the (fill in the blank).
  • So sweet of you to remember that I like _____ . Thank you!
  • Thank you for thinking of me. You are such a thoughtful person.
  • Thank you for _____ . It will be so useful for _____ .
  • I’m so lucky to have a friend like you. The _____ is fantastic. Thank you so much.
  • Thank you doesn’t seem enough for a (fill in extravagant gift), but you leave me speechless.
  • Thank you so much! You are great!
  • Thank you for being so nice. I love the _____ .
  • You couldn’t have picked better. Thank you.
  • Thank you for _____ .
  • Thank you so much!
  • Sweets from a sweet person like you are twice as nice. Thank you for remembering me on (fill in occasion).
  • Enjoyed your homemade treats. Thank you for taking the time to make (fudge, toffee, etc. fill in the blank).
  • Thank you for thinking of me this Christmas (or appropriate occasion).
  • I always love your gifts. Thank you for being such a special (fill in the blank, friend, mom, sister, etc.).
  • Thank you. You’re the best.
  • I will have so much fun (reading, eating, etc. fill in the blank appropriately). Thank you!
  • Love it! Love you! Thank you!
  • Thank you!

Pay It Forward With A Letter will give you more details on the lost art of letter writing. For more on why you should resolve to write thank you notes, see Time For The New Year And Thank Yous.

Posted in Cards, Caring, Children, culture, education, Family, Friendship, Home, homeschool, homeschooling, Household Tip, Household Tips, How To, Infinity Goods, infinitygoods.com, Letter Writing, life, Mail, New Year, Tips, writing | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , | 7 Comments »

WFMW — Put Used Christmas Cards To Good Use

Posted by infinitygoods on December 18, 2007

wfmwbluebanner.jpgBe sure to see my other Advent and Christmas ideas below too. I save some of my Christmas greeting cards because I’m the sentimental type, but here are some great uses for those who usually just discard them in the trash. These are some of the uses I find for the ones which do not hold special value to me. I love comments 😉 Also, if you have more ideas be sure to let all of us know what they are.

  1. Give them to a teacher (always ask first when giving). Many preschool, kindergarten and early grade teachers need these cards (Easter, Halloween, Thanksgiving, etc. too!) for their students to do paper crafts in class. Sometimes they use them to make collages to send cards to soldiers, senior citizens or the homeless. Some teachers will have their students use them to create a priceless gift to their parents. Some teachers will use them for their own bulletin boards to make the classroom more festive.
  2. Give them to a student artist or a professional artist. One of the professional artists at our church asks the office to save all the cards we receive for use as inspiration, models, etc. Some artists will separate the various colors and turn them into pulp for use as papier mache and handmade paper. Others use them as found objects for their art or even for installations.
  3. Give them to a church or senior group. When I was involved with our monthly Senior Luncheon group, the organizer would always be on the lookout for seasonal greeting cards to use as nametags, placecards, To/From tags and decorations. At Christmas and Valentine’s Day each senior would receive a card made from these used greeting cards. The card would be cut in half so that the side written on would be discarded. The picture side would either be folded in half or glued to a piece of paper and a personal message would be added for the senior. You have no idea how much joy it brought to some of these seniors. For some of them, this would be the only card anyone would give them. The church and the volunteers did not have a special card budget, so these recycled ones would be it or there would be nothing.
  4. Use them for scrapbooking. As we become more and more conscious of our environment, printers and card companies are using acid free paper and inks so they can be used to make some fancy frames, backgrounds, clip art, etc. for our photo albums and scrapbooks. Many cards today are even made by hand and have that three-dimensional effect that so many scrapbookers are looking for.
  5. Give them to your child for cutting. Younger children love to cut paper, and cardstock gives them a different texture to manipulate. Manipulatives are very important for a young child’s development and for fine motor skills. The ones with layers, ribbons, pop-ups, etc. can all be taken apart and possibly reconstructed by the child. Children can use the pictures to illustrate their own stories. Old magazines also work well for this.
  6. Save them until next year, and children can decorate their own small packages.
  7. Help your children make next year’s Advent calendar. You’ll need one card for the main scene in the front, from which you will cut out the 25 windows (cut three sides only, door-style). With a pencil, outline the windows on a piece of paper. You’ll need one or more cards for the back where you’ll glue the 25 mini-pictures to the outlines on the piece of paper. Then glue that paper to the back of the main scene with the 25 mini-pictures showing through the windows. Next year, you’ll bend back one window each day of Advent. If you do the craft this year, it will help your children transition from too much excitement during the pre-Christmas rush and too little excitement in the post-Christmas letdown and boredom before returning to school. This craft is not about making the prettiest, most professional-looking calendar (you can buy that at the store), it’s about letting your children practice gluing, cutting, aligning and using their creativity, while letting them do something more than just watch TV and boosting their self-esteem. If you put away the calendar(s) with the Christmas decorations, you will not lose them during the long year ahead. You can also elect to tuck in all your used cards with the decorations and they will be waiting for your children’s creative talents next Advent season.
  8. Another good child craft is to use cookie cutters (or a glass for a simple circle) to outline 25 scenes, cut them out with scissors, punch a small hole on either left/right or top/bottom and string them garland style. Your children can add bows in between each scene, or add beads, etc. Their creativity is the limit. You also have the option to add the numbers 1-25 on them. It will make a nice swag for across the mantle, a vertical garland to hang in their room or for the homeschool classroom for next year’s Advent.
  9. Frame them. Many cards are art reproductions of the Masters, and some may be from unknown artists at Hallmark or American Greetings but just as pretty, and will make cute holiday pictures to decorate your home. Get a few small frames from the dollar store (sometimes even two or three for $1) or insert them in frame ornaments for your tree, which have become so popular in recent years. There’s no law that says you must put in a family snapshot. You could put in a reproduction of the Holy Family or a cutesy teddy bear with a holly wreath if that’s more along your decorating theme (shop those after-Christmas sales for bargains).
  10. Our son, the future scientist, tells me the computer chip components from musical Christmas cards can be reused for scientific and robotic purposes.
  11. If you receive cards from Europe, they have a paper insert which is not glued to the card as they are here in the U.S., so you can just save/toss the insert and reuse the card as a brand new greeting card next year. All you’ll have to do is buy some envelopes.
  12. One senior citizen I used to know would cut away the written portion and send the picture portion as a Christmas postcard. On her tiny, fixed income, she would also save on postage, yet she was able to continue her social tradition of sending cards to everyone she knew. She said the ones which were not embossed worked best as it was more difficult to see that they were reused greeting cards.
  13. Save the written part of the card. Yes, you read that correctly. Professionals write these cards and say it better than most of us can, so save your favorite samples and incorporate them in your own greetings. Soon, even blank cards will be of no concern to you even if you are normally completely tongue tied. This works for birthday and especially sympathy cards.

For the rest of the Works For Me Wednesday participants, head to Rocks in My Dryer.

If you missed any of my Advent and Christmas ideas, just click below.

If you missed any of my household tips, just click below. I also have these as a separate page you can access any time at the header on top.

Posted in Advent, art, Arts and Crafts, blog, blogging, Blogroll, Cards, Caring, carnival, Children, Christian, Christianity, Christmas, crafts, culture, Family, Holidays, Home, homeschool, homeschooling, Household Tip, Household Tips, How To, Infinity Goods, infinitygoods.com, Internet, Letter Writing, life, Mail, Memories, Noel, Photography, Recycle, Reuse, Rocks In My Dryer, scrapbook, scrapbooking, Tips, Tradition, Uncategorized, works for me wednesday, Works For Me Wednesdays | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 7 Comments »

Advent Calendar Chain — An Easy Children’s Craft

Posted by infinitygoods on December 2, 2007

Today is the first Sunday of Advent. If you forgot to buy an Advent Calendar or if you’re simply looking for a super easy craft for your children to make, you can show them how to make an Advent Calendar Chain.

It will save you from hearing all month long, sometimes even several times a day, “How many more days until Christmas?” It will help your children get a sense of the passage of time and days, and it will help them with small motor skills by cutting, gluing and perhaps even drawing.

All you need are paper, scissors, glue and if coloring either pencils or markers. You can also get more elaborate by adding ribbons, stickers, beads, or whatever strikes your children’s fancy.

Good paper choices include Christmas scrapbook sheets, Christmas wrapping paper, origami paper, colored construction paper or if your children are coloring their own, then plain white paper or brown shopping bags for a more country look.

The size of each strip can vary. About half an inch to 2 inches by 5 to 7 inches works well. The narrower strips will look more dainty. The younger the child, the longer the loop should be so they don’t get frustrated trying to get their inexperienced fingers to work the loops.

You’ll need 25 strips. If you use craft scissors with waves or zigzags, it will add some interest to your chain. Your children should number the strips 1 through 25.

You have the choice of going by the calendar year (Dec. 1) or the church year (1st. Sunday which this year is Dec. 2). If your child is too young to write, you can do it for them or give them numbered stickers to place on. This helps with early math sense as well.

Show your children how to cut the strips and how to glue them into interconnecting loops. Most children will use too much glue so show them that a little goes a long way. Explain to them that each day they will be removing one loop from the chain to represent one less day until Christmas.

Two good ways to display the chain are across the mantle or hanging down vertically on a wall. You can even use a Christmas stocking hook. If you hang the chain on the wall, you can have your children draw a picture of the nativity or use a Christmas card of a nativity to place at the top. You could also cutout a large paper Christmas star for the top of your chain.

If you turn on the Christmas lights on the tree, turn on the Christmas music, maybe even sing along, and help your children in a relaxed manner, then you will not only be creating pleasant family memories, but creating traditions that your children will treasure so much they will want to recreate them with their own children.

Don’t forget to praise your children and to take lots of photos. Your children will never be this age again, so enjoy each stage and every step of the way.

Posted in Advent, Arts and Crafts, Christianity, Christmas, crafts, culture, education, Faith, Family, God, Holidays, Home, homeschool, homeschooling, Household Tip, Household Tips, How To, Infinity Goods, infinitygoods.com, life, religion, spirituality, Tips | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments »

SSSS — Training Hearts Blog Oozes with Christian Love

Posted by infinitygoods on November 18, 2007

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Super Simple Spiritual Sunday is a carnival list of blogs, posts or websites which are spiritually encouraging. To join in or to find other participants, visit Heart of Wisdom.

I’d like to share with you a blog I just discovered yesterday, but found to be a real blessing.

Training Hearts is a blog written by a Christian homeschooling mom named Tamara. Her blog oozes with thoughtfulness, generosity and Christian love. You’ll find lots of encouragement, Bible verses, household tips, homeschooling resources and ideas, prayers, and lots more.

Her readers love her and reward her with lots of comments.

You’ll want to visit again and again because her blog will give you a nice warm and cozy feeling. You even get to pick what her blog looks like with the theme picker.

Peace I leave with you; my peace I give to you.

Not as the world gives do I give it to you.

Do not let your hearts be troubled or afraid.

John 14:27

  • Don’t know what NaBloPoMo and NaNoWriMo are? Read all about it here and here.
  • Want to know why I’m participating in both? Click here.

Posted in blog, blogging, Blogroll, carnival, Christianity, education, Faith, Family, Friendship, God, Home, homeschool, homeschooling, Household Tip, Infinity Goods, infinitygoods.com, Internet, life, NaBloPoMo, NaNoWriMo, National Blog Post Month, National Novel Writing Month, novel, novel in 30 days, religion, spirituality, Tips, Website, writing | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »