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Archive for the ‘Medicine’ Category

Cloning Pioneer Rejects Embryonic Stem Cell Research

Posted by infinitygoods on November 19, 2007

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Ian Wilmut, the scientist who cloned Dolly the sheep, is abandoning embryonic stem cell research, finally admitting it does NOT work.

Embryonic stem cell research, also called nuclear transfer and therapeutic cloning research, requires destroying the embryos.

According to the Associated Press, “Tens of millions of dollars have been spent worldwide on therapeutic cloning research in the past decade, but nobody has made it work.” Embryonic stem cell research has only caused cancers in humans.

Even Dolly and a few cats cloned had numerous medical problems, premature aging and premature death.

Wilmut told London’s Daily Telegraph, “I decided a few weeks ago not to pursue nuclear transfer.” He will be researching a method inspired by Japanese scientist Shinya Yamanaka of Kyoto University.

Wilmut says that method does not require human eggs or the destruction of human embryos, which, he told reporters, many people are against.

According to AP that has “become a major stumbling block for funding and regulating research.”

It is “easier to accept socially,” Wilmut says.

The new method, called fibroblasts, slips four genes into mouse skin cells. According to AP, the altered cells behave similarly to embryonic stem cells.

Adult stem cell research has been far more successful but has been overshadowed by advertising and political campaigns in support of embryonic stem cell research.

Related research, which is also successful and not only used in the lab but also in human trials, is pig cell research. Scientists and medical doctors have successfully used pig cells as a solvable scaffolding for a patient’s own human cells to grow and replace organs and organ parts such as bladder, heart valves and wind pipes.

The horizon looks just a bit brighter today as Wilmut abandons embryonic stem cell research, opening the door for more scientists to admit it does not work and for the gratuitous slaying of embryonic human life to stop.

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Posted in aging, America, Britain, British, Cancer, Christianity, culture, education, Faith, Health, Infinity Goods, infinitygoods.com, Japan, life, Medicine, NaBloPoMo, NaNoWriMo, National Blog Post Month, National Novel Writing Month, News, novel, novel in 30 days, politics, religion, science, Science Experiments, Scientists, spirituality, Stem Cell Research, technology, U.S., Uncategorized, USA, Vatican, writing | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

I Vant Your Blood!!! Help!!! I Need Your Blood!!!

Posted by infinitygoods on October 30, 2007

“I vant your blood” is a favorite saying for Southern California resident Mary Melton, not only around Halloween, but year-round.

It’s never a joking matter for her, and it is an even more urgent need right now because she lives in the seven-county region affected by the California Wildfires and hurricane-force Santa Ana winds.

The Red Cross is always in dire need of that precious liquid of life, our blood, but it is an even bigger need when there is a federal emergency like these fires and winds and during the fast-coming holiday season.

That’s where Mary and her Respect Life Ministry come in. That’s also where every single one of you reading this article worldwide can help in more ways than one.

Especially if you are not from Southern California, your blood, your time, your money is needed right now, so please tell a friend about this urgent need and this article because Sherry Nikirk, senior account manager American Red Cross Donor Resources Development, says, “We import 40-60 percent of our blood supply.”

To some people, to respect life simply means to be against abortion, but it’s much more than that to Mary. It means to love life from conception to a natural death, and for her, that includes helping the Red Cross through blood drives.

With a single blood donation, the Red Cross can help save not just one life, but three.

That means everything to Mary. “I’m extremely committed to pro-life issues, and this falls into that category. Saving people’s lives is a pro-life issue,” Mary says.

She is so enthusiastic about her volunteer work for the Red Cross through the Los Angeles Archdiocese’s Respect Life Ministry, which she heads at her local parish, that she raised enough blood donations to save nearly a thousand lives this year.

Though Mary does not dedicate so much of her time to promote herself or to get any recognition, the Red Cross awarded her second place in the religious category for raising 304 units of blood for the Southern California Region, which comprises seven counties and 381 participating religious groups sponsoring blood drives.

These are the same seven counties which are so affected by the California Wildfires and hurricane-force Santa Ana winds.

On a good day, without a quarter of a million people busy evacuating their homes and finding Red Cross shelters, hotels or unaffected friends and family willing to offer hospitality, only about one-third of the population can donate blood.

“It is now estimated that, due to our aging population and increasing numbers of people who are not eligible to donate blood, only 37 percent of our population is currently eligible to donate,” says Charles Wilcox, Chief Executive Officer of Southern California Blood Services Region. “This is a significant decline from estimates from years past that listed 60 percent eligible. The fact that only about a third of our population can donate blood makes it even more critical that those who can donate do donate,” he says.

Those who can’t donate blood can still volunteer their time, just as Mary devotes so many hours, or they can donate money. Better yet, you can do all three.

According to Sherry, the Southern California Region needs to collect more than 1,500 units of blood each day to meet patient needs. That’s regardless of whether there’s a federal emergency preventing Southern Californians from donating. The need for blood, volunteers and money exists in your community, your state and your country too.

So please, help Southern California victims and help your own community regardless of where you live on our planet, because a fellow human being, maybe even a young and innocent child, needs blood.

As the Red Cross says, “Together we can save a life!”

Here are some contacts both locally and worldwide.

To schedule a blood drive in the United States: 1-800-491-2113

To donate individually in the United States: 1-800-Give Life (1-800-448-3543); (Espanol 1-866-Por Vida; 1-866-767-8432)

To volunteer in the United States: 1-800-498-9910

Worldwide, you can find your local Red Cross contact information at this Web site address: http://www.ifrc.org/address/directory.asp
It will take you to a list of just about every country in the world where there is an International Red Cross or Red Crescent organization. Click on your country to access your local contact information.

If you have a blog or a Web site, I give you full permission to link to this article in the hopes of saving more lives. Let me know about it so I can link to your article too.

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From left, Charles Wilcox, Chief Executive Officer, American Red Cross Blood Services, Southern California Region; Mary Melton, second place winner in the religious category for 2006-2007 with 304 units of blood raised; Glen Pierce, Chairman of the Board, American Red Cross Blood Services, Southern California Region.

Posted in aging, America, blog, blogging, Blogroll, blood money, Caring, Christianity, culture, education, Faith, Family, God, government agencies, Health, Home, Infinity Goods, infinitygoods.com, Internet, life, Los Angeles Archdiocese, Medicine, News, Organizing, religion, U.S., Uncategorized, USA, Website | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

You Can’t Trust Anybody These Days!

Posted by infinitygoods on October 12, 2007

As I turned on the TV news today, I was bombarded with recall after recall. On the headlines: infant cold and cough medicine with even the big names like Tylenol, more pot pies, more toys including Mattel again, baby strollers, carriers, etc. with Winnie the Pooh and made in Korea, lipsticks including name brands like L’Oreal and Dior with the prestige of Paris, but actually subcontracted just like Mattel, and the list went on too.

So what’s happening here? Are the government agencies more stringent than they have been in the past and these recalls would have been under the radar until now? Have companies gone insane and they are trying to kill consumers, the very hand that feeds them? Have some evil forces or the 9/11 Terrorists infiltrated even our formerly most trusted name brands in an attempt to kill even our youngest and our psyches? Are Communist countries like China behind it all?

None of it makes sense, but one thing is sure, the enemy, whoever it may be, is lurking behind every product these days.

Forget name brand loyalty. Forget Tylenol, Mattel, Dior. Spending more won’t be a guarantee of getting a decent product, let alone quality.

Forget saving money at the local dollar store or discount outlet. You’ll surely be putting your life at stake with just about every product there being made in China.

As my grandmother used to say, “we don’t know what to eat and drink anymore.” And what was true then, is mind boggling now. And now add “we don’t know what to breathe anymore” too, because even the smell of popcorn is killing us. (See my related blog post.)

It’s no solution for those of us living in cities, but if things don’t get better soon, at this rate, I foresee having to grow our own food, make our own toys, revert back to milk paint, feed our pets people food — actually with our own dog having been killed by the last pet food recall, we’re ALREADY doing that!

It’s a scary world out there. Self-sufficiency is starting to look good not just to wackos, but to the rest of us too. Horse and buggy here we come!

Posted in 9/11, America, Baby, blog, blogging, Blogroll, Car, cars, consumers, Cooking, culture, diet, Family, FDA, Food, Food and Drug Administration, food flavoring, food products, government agencies, Health, Home, humor, Infinity Goods, infinitygoods.com, Iraq, Islam, man-made chemicals, manufacturers, Medicine, News, OSHA, politics, popcorn, popcorn lung, terrorism, Toys, U.S., Uncategorized, USA, war on terror | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments »

Tell it on the Mountain. Tell All About Cancer.

Posted by infinitygoods on September 28, 2007

Cancer kills.  It has killed my father.  It has killed my grandmother, my grandfather, an aunt and uncle, and too many other relatives to mention.

Cancer has many forms and names, but the best way to beat the odds is early detection.  It’s never more important than when dealing with a fast-acting cancer such as inflammatory breast cancer.  While inflammatory breast cancer does not run in my family, anything we can do to educate ourselves and others is worth our time.

I am taking the invitation of fellow blogger Memegrl (memegrl.blogspot.com) to spread the word about cancer.  Below is her blog about her friend’s experience with inflammatory breast cancer while pregnant and how to detect this cancer to seek quick help from doctors.  Memegrl asks that you all feel free to post.  If you don’t have a blog, you can e-mail or even use good old word of mouth.

Spread the word because silence is deadly.

I also invite you to use this post as a platform to tell others about your experiences with cancer of any type.

Blessings to all.

“Monday, July 30, 2007
“And now for an important public service announcement

“I know, many of you who know me are well aware that my best friend was diagnosed with inflammatory breast cancer when she was pregnant. (Because she’s an overachiever like that. Most of us would have enough trouble with either cancer OR pregnancy AND working full time but nope, not her.) I had never heard of inflammatory breast cancer until the email from her. (“Are you sitting down? Good. I’m pregnant! I’m due in June and it’s a boy and he’s healthy and we’re thrilled. And I have breast cancer. It’s called inflammatory breast cancer, and it’s one of the most lethal forms, and I’m starting treatment tomorrow.” Yah. That’s the email you like to see from your BFF when you are strung out from trying to nurse your own newborn and desperately seeking comfort and connection from the internet.)

“Since that time, I have learned of three other women with it, which leads me to believe one of three things: 1) the percentage of all breast cancers that inflammatory represents must be growing from the stated 1%-5% (because really, otherwise how do I hear of all these and almost no others?); 2) further proof of the “once you become aware of something you find it everywhere” phenomenon (ever have that happen with a new word or idea–you never heard of it, then find it 6 times in a day?); or 3) it’s getting better press in general.

“Anyway, here’s a post from the latest diagnosee in Bloggityville. Please read it. Please remember it. Please do your BSEs, or remind someone you love. And, thankfully, my BFF is now a few years out and doing well.

“From Toddler Planet:

“Inflammatory breast cancer
“Monday July 23rd 2007, 3:11 pm
“Filed under: About Us / Favorites, breast cancer
“We hear a lot about breast cancer these days. One in eight women will be diagnosed with breast cancer in their lifetimes, and there are millions living with it in the U.S. today alone. But did you know that there is more than one type of breast cancer?

“I didn’t. I thought that breast cancer was all the same. I figured that if I did my monthly breast self-exams, and found no lump, I’d be fine.

“Oops. It turns out that you don’t have to have a lump to have breast cancer. Six weeks ago, I went to my OB/GYN because my breast felt funny. It was red, hot, inflamed, and the skin looked…funny. But there was no lump, so I wasn’t worried. I should have been. After a round of antibiotics didn’t clear up the inflammation, my doctor sent me to a breast specialist and did a skin punch biopsy. That test showed that I have inflammatory breast cancer, a very aggressive cancer that can be deadly.

“Inflammatory breast cancer is often misdiagnosed as mastitis because many doctors have never seen it before and consider it rare. “Rare” or not, there are over 100,000 women in the U.S. with this cancer right now; only half will survive five years. Please call your OB/GYN if you experience several of the following symptoms in your breast, or any unusual changes: redness, rapid increase in size of one breast, persistent itching of breast or nipple, thickening of breast tissue, stabbing pain, soreness, swelling under the arm, dimpling or ridging (for example, when you take your bra off, the bra marks stay – for a while), flattening or retracting of the nipple, or a texture that looks or feels like an orange (called peau d’orange). Ask if your GYN is familiar with inflammatory breast cancer, and tell her that you’re concerned and want to come in to rule it out.

“There is more than one kind of breast cancer. Inflammatory breast cancer is the most aggressive form of breast cancer out there, and early detection is critical. It’s not usually detected by mammogram. It does not usually present with a lump. It may be overlooked with all of the changes that our breasts undergo during the years when we’re pregnant and/or nursing our little ones. It’s important not to miss this one.

“Inflammatory breast cancer is detected by women and their doctors who notice a change in one of their breasts. If you notice a change, call your doctor today. Tell her about it. Tell her that you have a friend with this disease, and it’s trying to kill her. Now you know what I wish I had known before six weeks ago.

“You don’t have to have a lump to have breast cancer.

“P.S. Feel free to steal this post too. I’d be happy for anyone in the blogosphere to take it and put it on their site, no questions asked. Dress it up, dress it down, let it run around the place barefoot. I don’t care. But I want the word to get out. I don’t want another young mom — or old man — or anyone in between — to have to stare at this thing on their chest and wonder, is it mastitis? Is it a rash? Am I overreacting? This cancer moves FAST, and early detection and treatment is critical for survival.

“Thank you.”

Posted in blogging, Breast Cancer, Cancer, Cancer Experiences, Health, Inflammatory Breast Cancer, life, Lump, Mammogram, Mastitis, Medicine, memgrl.blogspot.com | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »