Infinity Goods blog

A blog for God’s People

Posts Tagged ‘history’

BrainPOP Works For Moms And Kids

Posted by infinitygoods on March 25, 2008

wfmwbluebanner.jpgA bunch of us moms were discussing what works for us regarding our children’s education and a lot of things were brought to the table, but the moms were unanimous about one teaching tool. At the time, it was brand new to me, but my trusted network of moms went on and on, and on about all the qualities of this animated educational site: BrainPOP! I am not affiliated in any way with this company.

All the moms loved it because it truly taught their kids and because their kids loved it too. It works for us, and I’m sure it will work for you too. Go check it out for free for two weeks.

If you use BrainPop, go ahead and put in your two cents.

What teaching tools work for you and your kids?

Be sure to visit Rocks In My Dryer for more participants.

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Posted in America, Blogroll, Caring, Children, Children's games, consumers, deals, education, entertainment, Family, free, frugal, history, Home, homeschool, homeschooling, Household Tip, Household Tips, How To, howto, Infinity Goods, infinitygoods.com, Internet, life, Math, reading, savings, science, Science Experiments, solution, Tips, U.S., Uncategorized, United States, USA, Website, WFMW, women, works for me wednesday, Works For Me Wednesdays, writing | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments »

My Beloved Is To Me A Cluster Of Henna Blossoms

Posted by infinitygoods on March 11, 2008

http://the160acrewoods.wordpress.comFor more participants Spreading God’s Word with Word Filled Wednesday, visit Amy Deanne at The 160 Acre Woods.”My beloved is to me a cluster of henna blossoms in the vineyards of Engedi.” Song of Songs 1:14

This is the henna blossom which produces the temporary ink for the Middle Eastern and Indian body art tradition.

Henna Blossom temporary body art in henna by Jamie McAlpin with artist's permission

Henna blossom temporary body art by Jaimie McAlpin with artist's permission

You may freely reprint the following article or place it on your website by adding the statement: Courtesy of www.kingtutshop.com. This fascinating plant is world wide known for the beautiful coloring dye that is used by the Orientals in coloring their hands and body. The Egyptians are said to have prepared both an oil and an ointment from the flowers for making the limbs supple. Egyptian Royalty were said to dye their hair with Henna leaves. Henna’s botanical name is Lawsonia Inermis,its common name is Jamaica Mignonette, Mendee, Egyptian privet, smooth Lawsonia. Its Arabic name is henna and the most popular Indian name is Mendhi.

The earliest civilizations that can be proved to have used henna include the Babylonians, Assyrians, Sumerians, Semites, Ugaritics and Canaanites. The leaves of the henna plant are the source of a red-brown dye widely used for body art, known as mendhi in South Asia. First used in the Near East and South Asia, henna art is now popular around the world.

There are numerous artifacts from Iraq, Palestine, Greece, Egypt, Crete and Rome from 1400 BCE to 1AD that show women with henna patterns on their hands. The early center of the use of henna as a woman’s adornment seems to have been in the eastern Mediterranean, where it grows wild. It was used by the Canaanite women in pre-biblical times The Canaanites spread their traditions, including the use of henna, across North Africa between 1700 and 600 BCE, specifically establishing the Berber traditions of henna in Morocco.

Henna was used in Palestine from the earliest historical period, and there are Roman records of henna being used by Jewish people living in Jerusalem during the historical period of the birth of Christ.

When Islam began in the 6-7th centuries AD, henna was incorporated into the customs of Muslims from the western Middle Eastern women’s henna traditions that were widespread and long established. As Islam expanded quickly into other countries, the use of henna went with it. All of the countries that were part of the Islamic world have used henna at some time, most frequently as part of wedding celebrations. Most of them continued to celebrate the “Night of the Henna” and regard henna as a beautiful and suitable ornament for women until present day.

Since 1890 it has been widely used in Europe for tinting the hair, usually in the form of a shampoo, many shades being obtainable by mixing with the leaves of other plants, such as indigo. As a dye for the skin or nails the powder may be mixed with lemon juice, made into a paste with hot water, and spread on the part to be dyed, being allowed to remain for one night.

The parts used are the leaves that are dried and then crushed to form a dark green powder. The flowers and also the fruit are also used. Flowers are numerous, small, white or rose coloured and fragrant. The plant lives scarcely in dry decidious forests, widely cultivated as a hedge plant. It is mostly found in Egypt, India, Kurdistan, Iran, Syria.

It is widely cultivated in tropical countries but probably native to North Africa and Asia. It is widely naturalized in the West Indies and Mexico where it is known as “mignonette.” Its leaves produce the henna or alhenna of the Arabs (cyprus of the ancients), a yellow die which is used in Egypt and elsewhere by women to color their nails, and by men to die their beards, and for other similar uses including horses manes and tails. It is known in the West Indies as “Egyptian privet”, and sometimes as “reseda”.

The small, white and yellow, heavy, sweet-smelling flowers are borne on dwarf shrubs 8 to 10 feet high and reaching a height of up to 6 meters, the plant has fragrant white or rose-red flowers.

Henna is planted today primarily as an ornamental hedge, but is probably best known for the dried, ground leaves traditionally used to produce colorfast orange, red, and brown dyes.

The constituents of Henna is found in it in a brown substance of a resinoid fracture, having the chemical properties which characterize the tannins, and therefore named hennotannic acid. Dried, powdered leaves of henna contain about 0.5 to 1.5 percent lawsone, the chief constituent responsible for the dyeing properties of the plant. Henna also contains mannite, tannic acid, 2-hydroxy-1:4-naphthoquinone resin mucilage, gallic acid, glucose, mannitol,fat, resin and mucilage are also present.The colouring matter is the quinone .and napthaquinone.

USES

Medicinal Action and Uses

As a medicinal plant, henna has been used as an astringent, antihemorrhagic, intestinal antineoplastic, cardio-inhibitory, hypotensive, and a sedative. It has been employed both internally and locally in jaundice, leprosy, smallpox, and affections of the skin. The fruit is thought to have emmenagogue properties.

It has also been used as a folk remedy against amoebiasis, headache, jaundice, ranging from beriberi to burns and bruises ans leprosy.Henna extracts show antibacterial, antifungal, and ultraviolet light screening activity. Henna has exhibited antifertility activity in animals and may induce menstruation.

Henna has been used as medical treatment for wide range of ailments to cure almost anything from headache to leprosy and other skin disorders. It is used to create an instant ‘Scab’ on large areas & is believed to have antiseptic properties. As a cooling agent it is used for burning of skin. It also has great dandruff fighting ability.

Henna is also used for rheumatic and arthritic pains. Alcoholic extract of the leaves showed mild anti- bacterial activity against Staph aureus and E. coli’. Antibacterial and antifungal activities have been confirmed .The antihaemorrhagic properties are attributed to lawsone. The naphthoquinone has emmenogogue and oxytocic actions.

The dried leaf and petiole of henna are generally recognized as safe when used as a color additive for hair. A distilled water prepared from them is used as a cosmetic, and the powdered leaves have been in use from the most ancient times in Eastern countries for dyeing the hair and the nails a reddish-yellow. Traditionally henna is used to decorate hands and feet during weddings and other ceremonies.

Henna features in the Siddha system of medicine. Siddha physicians consider parts of henna to be astringent, detergent, deodorant, cooling and a sedative. Fresh leaves mixed with vinegar or lime juice are bandaged onto the soles of the feet to treat ‘burning feet’, a symptom of beriberi. Ground leaves are applied to sore joints to ease rheumatism. The juice of the plant can be applied to the skin for headaches, and the oil is applied to hair to prevent it from going grey.

Its flower oil relieves muscular pains, while its seeds are used as a deodorant and to regulate menstruation. Henna flowers induce sleep, cure headaches and bruises. Leprosy has been treated by henna bark, as well as by an extract of leaves, flowers and shoots. The bark has also been used to treat symptoms of jaundice and enlargement of the liver and spleen. It can be applied to the skin to treat eczema, scabies, fungal infections and burns.

The Ayurvedic system uses the henna leaves to treat vitiligo (pale patches on the skin where pigment is lost), and the seeds are used to cure fever. Fruit oil is a folk remedy used in disorders causing hardening of the liver and diaphragm, and an ointment made from young fruit is used to prevent itching.

You may freely reprint the following article or place it on your website by adding the statement: Courtesy of www.kingtutshop.com.

Posted in art, Arts and Crafts, bible, Blogroll, carnival, Christian, Christianity, Church, culture, education, Faith, Family, God, God's Word, Health, Infinity Goods, infinitygoods.com, Islam, Jewish, Judaism, life, reading, religion, Spiritual, spirituality, Spreading God's Word, women, Word Filled Wednesday | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments »

Thursday Thirteen #16: Books I Want To Read

Posted by infinitygoods on February 13, 2008

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For more participants visit Thursday Thirteen.

Let me know if you’ve read any of these and how you liked them, or let me know what you would highly recommend as don’t-miss-books. Wishing you all a Happy St. Valentine’s Day Thursday!

1. The Animal Dialogues: Uncommon Encounters in the Wild by Craig Childs (non-fiction) I love adventure, but the best I can do is Adventures in Barbecuing and an occasional camping trip so I live vicariously through books in the comfort and safety of my armchair. Childs will take me to Alaska, Washington, Colorado, Arizona and New Mexico to discover beautiful creatures like the Great Blue Heron, ravens, owls, coyotes, mountain lions and jaguars. Some of these animals are in my own backyard and I often watch them through my windows so it won’t take much imagination for me to be transported to the great wildernesses of our American West.

2. Paris Review Interviews edited by Philip Gourevitch (Non-Fiction — the 3rd volume in a series is to be released soon) I’m a journalist and a writer so interviews, authors and writing are always of interest to me. Here writers have interviewed other writers like Steven King, T. S. Eliot, Jorge Luis Borges, John Gardner and Alice Munro.

3. The Folded World by Amity Paige (Fiction) I’m not so much interested in the basic plot, but in the subplot dealing with schizophrenia and other mental illnesses, as I once worked for a crisis helpline with more than our fair share of schizophrenics which always made me think that some local doctors must have been giving our phone number to patients. The book is about a young social worker torn between the needs of his clients and of his own family.

4. The Worst Hard Time: The Untold Story of Those Who Survived the Great American Dust Bowl by Timothy Egan (Non-Fiction) It has history, travel and according to the reviews I’ve read, superb, award-winning journalistic talent, so how can I possibly resist?

5. My Life In France by Julia Child (Non-Fiction) My husband and I were at the bookstore recently, a favorite pastime of ours, and I became completely engrossed by this book. In this memoir, she recalls her years in “La Belle France” as she calls her adopted home during the 1950s. She describes my native country as only a lover of France and its people could. It is a consummate love affair with everything French and she transports us to a time where she finally finds her self and her calling while in the arms of her other amour, her husband Paul Child. I don’t know how I could possibly have missed this book for the last two years. Julia is my favorite chef because her recipes are well-tested. She is the only chef I would trust enough for me to cook a recipe for the 1st time and serve it to company or even to a stereotypical evil mother-in-law. I know without even the shadow of a doubt that she will guide me right down to the last grain of salt and will not only tell me what to do, but much more importantly, what pitfalls to not fall into. Julia doesn’t just give us recipes, she teaches us how to cook.

6. Reading For Writers: A Guide For People Who Love Books and For Those Who Want to Write Them by Francine Prose (Non-Fiction) In other words, a guide written for yours truly. 😉

7. House Calls: Reflections of a Family Physician by Thomas L. Stern, M.D. (Non-Fiction) Medicine is another field of interest for me. Dr. Stern was the role model and technical adviser for the Marcus Welby, M.D. television show, and in this book he tells us the story of his life. This quote on the back cover particularly caught my eye: “I’ll tell you stories of the warmth of patients’ feelings toward me as their doctor; but especially, I’ll tell you about how I loved each of them, the people who trusted me enough to refer to me as ‘my doctor.'” Having worked with doctors and having had a few doctors I call ‘my doctor,’ I can tell you that the ones who care are the ones who make all the difference in the world.

8. Rumpole And The Primrose Path by John Mortimer (Fiction) I have read all previous Rumpole books — several times — and it is high time I read this one. Rumpole makes me laugh out loud and heartily, and let me tell you, we adults need to laugh a whole lot more often. I also love the Rumpole PBS series with Leo McLeod also of The Prisoner.

9. The Reluctant Tuscan: How I Discovered My Inner Italian by Phil Doran (Non-Fiction) From the writer and producer of The Wonder Years and Who’s The Boss, this travel memoir is reminiscent of A Year in Provence by Peter Mayle and the cover promises another laugh-out-loud adventure.

10. Gerald’s Game by Stephen King (Fiction) I was recently given this book I had never read from the early 1990s. I hope it’s one of King’s really-scary-in-a-great-sort-of-way books and not one of his books describing evil because I don’t like those. But his truly scary ones are the work of a tremendously talented writer

11. Summer of Night by Dan Simmons (Fiction) From the library of the same person who gave me Gerald’s Game. I never read horror except for Stephen King, but since King says “one of those rare must-read books. I am in awe of Dan Simmons,” then I must have been missing something good all these years.

12. The Tomb of Tutankhamen by Howard Carter (Non-Fiction) Another adventure in my armchair to help me experience the greatest archaeological discovery and excavation of all time. Tut has fascinated the world since 1922 and I too have fallen prey to his magical hypnosis from beyond the sarcophagus.

13. The Best Cat Ever by Cleveland Armory (Non-Fiction) If you too have ever been owned by a cat, you might also want to read about Polar Bear and his curmudgeon author.

Don’t forget to leave a comment so we can all visit you too. 😉

    Posted in America, American Cookery, author, Barbecue, blog, blogging, Blogroll, book, books, Britain, British, carnival, Cookbook, Cookbooks, Cooking, culture, england, entertainment, Food, France, history, Home, Infinity Goods, infinitygoods.com, Italy, Kittens, Library, life, nature, Paris, pets, reading, Recipe, television, Thursday 13, Thursday Thirteen, Tips, travel, U.S., Uncategorized, USA, writing | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 5 Comments »

    I’m Still Dreaming; I’d Rather Be Singing

    Posted by infinitygoods on January 20, 2008

    Martin Luther King Jr. (1929 - 1968) I have a dream speach; Print designed by Tio and posted on Flickr’s public files

    Would you rather be singing too?

    Posted in African American, America, American History, art, Black, blog, blogging, Blogroll, celebrities, Childhood Memories, Children, choir, Christian, Christianity, Church, culture, education, Faith, Family, Famous Speeches, Flickr, Freedom, Friendship, God, history, Home, homeschool, homeschooling, Household Tip, Household Tips, How To, howto, Infinity Goods, infinitygoods.com, Internet, Israel, Jewish, Journalism, Judaism, Legacy, life, Martin Luther King Jr., Media, Memories, murder, Music, Nation, Negro, Negro Spiritual, New Year, News, nonbelievers, Obituary, Organizing, Photography, Photojournalism, politics, Race, Racism, religion, Republic, Resolution, singing, Slavery, Slaves, Speech, Spiritual, spirituality, Tradition, U.S., Uncategorized, United States, USA, Website, writing | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments »

    Flickr Delivers Library Of Congress’ Historical Eye Candy

    Posted by infinitygoods on January 18, 2008

    Woman Aircraft Workermain-church-altar-trampas-nm.jpgSunsetlocomotive-driver-wheel.jpgInstructor and Students Studying Map, Meacham Field, Ft. Worth, Texas

    The United States Library of Congress pilot program launched on Flickr just two days ago has Web viewers entranced with its display of 3,115 images from the library’s extensive photo collection and clamoring for more.

    Last night’s statistics from just one day on Flickr reveals the following:Girl Next To Barn With Chicken

    • 392,000 views on the photostream;
    • 650,000 views of photos;
    • Adding in set and collection page views, there were about 1.1 million total views on their account;
    • All 3,100+ photos have been viewed;
    • 420 of the photos have comments;
    • 1,200 of the photos have been favorited.

    The Library has struck a chord with the people of the Internet. Matt Raymond, the author of the Library’s 9 month old blog and director of communications says, “The response to the Library’s pilot project with Flickr has been nothing short of astounding. You always hope for a positive reaction to something like this, but it has been utterly off the charts—from the Flickr community, from the blogosphere, from the news media—it is nothing short of amazing.”

    And we all want more photos. The most frequently asked question on both the Flickr and the blog comments is asking when the library will upload even more photos. There are more than 1 million photos on the library’s Web site and some are easily viewable as sample images, but the great majority of these images can only be accessed through search words. If you want to see the images in say their Daguerreotype collection youA-20 Bomber Being Riveted By Woman Worker, Douglas Aircraft Co., Long Beach, California have to type in specific search words, and there my friends is where the Library of Congress’ Web site went totally wrong and where the Flickr project went totally right, because if you don’t know what to search for or you just want to see what’s available, you are facing a computer screen full of daunting type and not one single beautiful image; no eye candy, no mesmerizing piece of history, no emotionally stirring art.

    If you like history or photography, or better yet, like me you like both, you will be spending hours pouring over your LOC Flickr screen, so be forewarned, this may be a whole new addiction which might even spawn further interests you will just HAVE to research.

    • A note on the high quality of these historical photographs: “The scans are not color corrected or adjusted to create an optimized view of the photographic scene, rather they represent the qualities of the images as they exist in the collection at the time they are scanned.”
    Carpenter, Douglas Dam, TenesseStacks Of Home Canned FoodPutting Finishing Touches On B-17F Navy Bomber

    Filling Station And Garage At Pie Town, New MexicoJim Norris Homesteader, Pie Town, New Mexico
    • For an article about Pie Town, New Mexico and Russell Lee, the photographer who chronicled its homesteaders, visit this Smithsonian article.

    Posted in America, American History, art, Arts and Crafts, blog, blogging, Blogroll, crafts, Cuisine, culture, education, eggs, Family, film, Flickr, government agencies, history, Home, homeschool, homeschooling, Infinity Goods, infinitygoods.com, Internet, Journalism, Library Of Congress, life, manufacturers, nature, News, reading, technology, Tips, Tradition, U.S., Uncategorized, USA, writing | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments »

    Thursday Thirteen #6 — My Interests

    Posted by infinitygoods on November 14, 2007

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    I am sharing with you 13 topics which interest me and are important to me. They are in no particular order, because most of these would all tie with each other. These are topics
    you see and which will recur on my blog. To see more participants in this carnival or for
    details on how to join, visit Thursday Thirteen.

    1. Computers/Internet/Blogs/Technology/Science
    These sort of overlap in many ways. I’m forward thinking and I’ve been using computers
    since before my teen years, back in the days when people were saying it was a waste of
    time, and it wouldn’t last. Wait, aren’t a lot of people still saying that? Well 30+
    years later, I’m still interested. I remember asking for a calculator as a Christmas gift
    when I was in Kindergarten. The people selling them were flabbergasted that a child would want one and thought no child would ever need one. This “pocket” calculator, the smallest on the market at the time, was about the size of a small paperback!

    2. Fine Art
    I was an art history minor and an art minor. I seriously considered switching it to my
    major, and often wonder if I didn’t make a mistake. I draw, paint, photograph, make
    ceramics and do a lot of new media paintings — that’s every stroke hand-painted by me, but instead of using paint, I use computers. Museums and galleries recognize new media, but the average person out there still claims the computer makes the paintings. Not so! This would be the equivalent of saying oil paint and brushes are the artists making the artwork. Computers do not make art. Paint and brushes do not make art. The people, the artists make art, regardless of which tools they use.

    3. History/Biographies/Autobiographies
    As much as I like the future, I also like the past. We can learn from our past and our
    past can help us understand our present. I’m very much interested in people and their
    lives which is why I like history and also what leads me to the next item.

    4. Psychology/Sociology
    I’m interested in people and what makes them tick. I’m also interested in science, so
    psychology helps me understand the individual and sociology helps me understand the groups and societies we live in. In college my sociology professor had wanted me to switch majors to either sociology (he hoped) or psychology (which he admitted was related and thought I would like too). I ended up with an additional certificate in psychology, but I never switched majors to either psychology or sociology.

    5. Cross-stitching/Crafts
    My grandmother taught me how to cross-stitch and I spent numerous hours watching her even before she taught me how to do it. I find it very relaxing and as I like art and to create, cross-stitching and other crafts are just related to that.

    6. Reading/Writing/Journalism/News/Books
    These are all intertwined. As a professional journalist, writing and reading are just my
    life. I just could not live without reading. I have to learn at all times and reading is
    the best way for me to do that. I have been wanting to write since early childhood. I
    have attempted not to write for a living, but life was just too miserable without a pen in
    my hand or a keyboard at my fingertips. I’m a published journalist, but I would love to be a published author using either my journalistic skills to write non-fiction or even writing a
    novel. I’m one of the crazy participants in National Novel Writing Month. Any publishers
    out there interested in my writing voice?

    7. Religion/God
    I believe in God and shout it from the rooftops, but won’t attempt to convert atheists as
    belief needs to come from inside your heart and soul. I worked for my parish for several
    years and wanted to work there until retirement, but an evil man came into our midst,
    getting rid of staff and clergy, swiftly putting a financially viable parish in the red,
    and destroying the work of the last 40+ years. Some will turn away from God because of
    him, but the destruction he brings is not of God. Destruction can never be of God.

    8. Education
    I love to learn, my husband and I have both taught, and since we have a son, education is very important to us. He went to private schools for several years and while that was fine, we found something better through an excellent public school system with an independent study program. Forget all the stereotypes of homeschooling and of public school. That’s not what it is. It’s more a combination of when people had private tutors teach their children, the one-room schools and parents nurturing their own children. The program is what it is thanks to our son’s wonderful teachers, especially the founder, Resa Steindel Brown. If you want a glimpse at what it’s all about, read her fantastic book, The Call to Brilliance: A True Story to Inspire Parents and Educators. You can also read about his science teacher in my blog posts here and here.

    9. Family
    Family and extended family is extremely important to me. It is where we receive and give love and support. Here on Earth, not counting God in Heaven, it is the one most important thing and it just doesn’t get more basic than that.

    10. Movies/Plays
    I don’t watch much TV, but I love a good movie or play. While it can’t replace a good
    book, it’s still a story, whether real or fictional, and I love to be entertained. I
    prefer comedies, especially for movies, because I don’t know about your life, but my life
    is enough of a drama as it is. I just don’t need other people’s too, especially the made-
    up ones. I really like adventures too, because this way I can escape to some fabulous
    world and live vicariously. I would like science fiction, but most don’t meet my quality
    standards unfortunately.

    11. Hiking/Walking/Swimming
    I enjoy being in nature and these are the most fun forms of exercise for me. These are not boring to me. I enjoy the scenery. Running would be too fast and strenuous to enjoy the
    scenery. These are also quiet and since I despise noise, anything with bouncing balls,
    whistling referees or echoing gymnasiums just would not work for me.

    12. Cooking/Gourmet Food/Reading Cookbooks
    Yes, I read cookbooks. I actually read cookbooks more than I eat or cook. As a teen my
    mom would tell me that I read cookbooks instead of eating. I also love to cook when I
    don’t have a full-time job. If I’m working, then cooking is no longer a pleasure and
    something that I do for the family that I love. It becomes a chore and a race to put
    anything on a plate in front of starving eyes in less than half an hour from the time I run
    through the front door. But when I am not working, I will use all my knowledge from
    reading all these cookbooks and all my creativity and use cooking as another art-form. I
    also like real food. I am against eating engineered chemicals, dyes, artificial products.
    I like wild salmon, trout and other fish, I like real butter on all my foods and especially
    my popcorn. And you really don’t want me to get started on cloned meat, or cloned
    anything, because I’m really against that!

    13.Travel
    I don’t travel enough. I would love to travel 365 days a year, but that’s simply not
    possible. I put roots down with a family and a house. Once upon a time I contemplated
    becoming a foreign correspondent, a travel writer and even a pilot or a stewardess, just so
    that I could travel, but I will just have to be satisfied with having been to Germany,
    France, Switzerland, Italy, England, Washington, Oregon, California, Hawaii, Arizona,
    Nevada, Georgia, … Oops, that sounds like another Thursday Thirteen! 😉

    Just click on Mister Linky to add your Thursday 13 link and see the other participants who linked here. And please don’t forget to post a comment. Thanks!

    • Don’t know what NaBloPoMo and NaNoWriMo are? Read all about it here and here.
    • Want to know why I’m participating in both? Click here.

    Posted in art, blog, blogging, book, books, butter flavoring, carnival, Children, Christianity, Cookbook, Cookbooks, Cooking, culture, education, Faith, Family, Food, food flavoring, food products, Home, homeschool, homeschooling, Infinity Goods, infinitygoods.com, Internet, Journalism, life, man-made chemicals, Media, NaBloPoMo, NaNoWriMo, National Blog Post Month, National Novel Writing Month, natural foods, nature, News, novel, novel in 30 days, nutrition, Photojournalism, popcorn, popcorn lung, reading, Recipe, religion, Salmon, science, Science Experiments, Scientists, spirituality, Stem Cell Research, technology, Thursday 13, Thursday Thirteen, Trout, writing | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 7 Comments »